Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Got to go? Scientists figure out how you know

Date:
February 8, 2013
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
Help is on the way for overactive bladder or incontinence. According to new research the epithelium, a layer of cells lining the bladder's surface, senses bladder fullness through proteins called integrins. As the bladder becomes full, the epithelium stretches and becomes thinner, activating the integrins, which sends information to nerves and other cells. This research may help design drugs that target this mechanism to treat incontinence and overactive bladder.

If you have an overactive bladder or incontinence, help could be on the way. A new research report published online in the FASEB Journal, shows that the epithelium, a thin layer of cells which line the surface of the bladder, is able to sense how full the bladder is through the action of a family of proteins called integrins. As the bladder becomes full, the cells in the epithelium stretch and become thinner, which activates the integrins to send that information to nerves and other cells in the bladder. As a result of this new knowledge, researchers may one day be able to design drugs that target this mechanism to treat conditions like incontinence and overactive bladder, both of which are common, serious, problems affecting millions of people.

"I am very hopeful that as we learn more about how the bladder senses fullness and conveys that information to the nerves and the muscles which control our ability to urinate, that this greater understanding and knowledge will lead to new treatments," said Warren G. Hill, Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. "It is extremely important that we do this as quickly as possible, since there are millions of people who suffer enormously from the anguish of bladder pain, incontinence and constant feelings of needing to go. I am optimistic these new insights into the role of integrins will begin the process of discovering important new drug targets which will dramatically improve the quality of life for many of these people."

To make this discovery, Hill and colleagues tested two groups of mice. The first were genetically modified to not have an important member of the integrin family present in the epithelium. The second group of mice was normal. The mice lacking the integrin protein had normal looking bladders but very little urinary control. The normal mice also had normal looking bladders, but as expected, had bladder control. Researchers then tested the bladders from the integrin knockout mice and found that their bladders were constantly squeezing and very overactive. In addition, they overfilled their bladders and took much longer to urinate than the normal mice. Since most drug treatments for overactive bladder target proteins in the muscle surrounding the bladder, this study shows that it may be possible to design drugs that target sensory proteins in the epithelium.

"No one wants to pee in his or her pants," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of the FASEB Journal, "but the reality is that bladder problems -- incontinence, frequency and pain -- affect more people than we realize. This report offers hope that new drugs targeting the bladder's epithelium will succeed when current drugs fail."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Keizo Kanasaki, Weiqun Yu, Maximilian von Bodungen, John D. Larigakis, Megumi Kanasaki, Francisco Ayala de la Pena, Raghu Kalluri, and Warren G. Hill. Loss of β1-integrin from urothelium results in overactive bladder and incontinence in mice: a mechanosensory rather than structural phenotype. FASEB J, 2013 DOI: 10.1096/fj.12-223404

Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Got to go? Scientists figure out how you know." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130208182825.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2013, February 8). Got to go? Scientists figure out how you know. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130208182825.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Got to go? Scientists figure out how you know." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130208182825.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) Here are three things you need to know about the deadly Ebola outbreak's progression this week. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) State health officials say testing has confirmed the presence of a killer amoeba in a water system serving three St. John the Baptist Parish towns. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 28, 2014) The World Health Organisation has called for the regulation of electronic cigarettes as both tobacco and medical products. Ciara Lee looks at the impact of the move on the tobacco industry. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

Newsy (Aug. 28, 2014) CDC director Tom Frieden says the Ebola outbreak is even worse than he feared. But he also said there's still hope to contain it. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins