Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Food and beverages not likely to make breast-fed babies fussy

Date:
February 13, 2013
Source:
Loyola University Health System
Summary:
Many new moms fear that eating the wrong foods while breast-feeding will make their baby fussy. However, no sound scientific evidence exists to support claims that certain foods or beverages lead to fussiness in infants, according to a registered dietitian.

Many new moms fear that eating the wrong foods while breast-feeding will make their baby fussy. However, no sound scientific evidence exists to support claims that certain foods or beverages lead to fussiness in infants, according to Gina Neill, a Loyola University Health System registered dietitian.

"One of the many reasons women stop breast-feeding is because they believe they have to follow restrictive dietary guidelines," Neill said. "However, a nursing mom's food and beverage intake does not have to be as regimented as you might think."

Here are the rules women need to know while breast-feeding their little one:

Monitor your alcohol intake

Your breast milk is comparable to your blood level in terms of alcohol content. If you plan to drink moderately while nursing, breast-feed shortly before you consume alcohol. Having a couple of drinks is not a good reason to resort to formula. And supplementing with formula can cause your milk supply to decrease.

Fish may be the perfect catch, in moderation

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommend that pregnant and breast-feeding women avoid eating shark, swordfish, king mackerel or tilefish. These fish have high levels of mercury. However, don't make the mistake of avoiding fish altogether. Fish that are high in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, also can help your baby's brain and eyes develop. Breast-feeding mothers can eat up to 12 ounces a week (two average servings) of fish and shellfish that have lower concentrations of mercury. This includes shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock and catfish. Albacore (white) tuna has more mercury than canned light tuna and should be limited to 6 ounces (one average meal) per week.

Make no beans about brewing up caffeine

Most breast-feeding women can drink a moderate amount of caffeine without it affecting their infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics defines moderate intake as two to three cups of a caffeinated beverage per day. However, some young infants are sensitive to caffeine and become irritable or have difficulty sleeping even with small amounts of caffeine. An infant's sensitivity to caffeine usually lessens over time.

Spice up your baby's diet

You may have heard that babies can develop gas and become fussy from foods with citrus, garlic, chocolate or ethnic flavors, but fussiness and gas are normal in newborns, so it is unlikely these behaviors are related to your food intake. Even when a baby does react to a food in the mother's diet, the specific food that causes a reaction will vary from baby to baby. A true allergy will usually produce a skin rash or blood in your baby's stool. This usually occurs between two and six weeks of age but may occur earlier. Elimination diets can identify what triggers an allergic reaction. If you think your baby has an allergy, talk to your doctor and a registered dietitian.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Loyola University Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Loyola University Health System. "Food and beverages not likely to make breast-fed babies fussy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213114511.htm>.
Loyola University Health System. (2013, February 13). Food and beverages not likely to make breast-fed babies fussy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213114511.htm
Loyola University Health System. "Food and beverages not likely to make breast-fed babies fussy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213114511.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Tens of thousands of doses of experimental Ebola vaccines could be available for "real-world" testing in West Africa as soon as January as long as they are deemed safe in soon to start trials, the World Health Organization said Tuesday. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins