Science News
from research organizations

Taste preferences impact health, new study finds

Date:
February 13, 2013
Source:
Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)
Summary:
Individuals who have a high preference for sweets and a high aversion to bitter flavors may be at an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed how two tasting profiles, sweet likers (SL) and supertasters (ST), interact and affect dietary intake and health, particularly metabolic syndrome.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

Individuals who have a high preference for sweets and a high aversion to bitter flavors may be at an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, according to a new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT).

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill analyzed how two tasting profiles, sweet likers (SL) and supertasters (ST), interact and affect dietary intake and health, particularly metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a name for a group of risk factors that occur together and increase the risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, and type-2 diabetes.

What researchers found is that those with both taste profiles or neither taste profiles were more likely to have an increased risk of metabolic syndrome compared to those who were only an SL or ST. The interaction between SL and ST was also significantly associated with fiber and beverage intake suggesting that tasting patterns may have an effect on both dietary intake and disease risk.

The researchers recommend that more research be done to explore testing of these tasting profiles in order to assist with tailoring dietary interventions to prevent and treat metabolic syndrome.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gabrielle Turner-McGrievy, Deborah F. Tate, Dominic Moore, Barry Popkin. Taking the Bitter with the Sweet: Relationship of Supertasting and Sweet Preference with Metabolic Syndrome and Dietary Intake. Journal of Food Science, 2013; 78 (2): S336 DOI: 10.1111/1750-3841.12008

Cite This Page:

Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). "Taste preferences impact health, new study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213152120.htm>.
Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). (2013, February 13). Taste preferences impact health, new study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213152120.htm
Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). "Taste preferences impact health, new study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213152120.htm (accessed July 28, 2015).

Share This Page: