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Modeling Alzheimer's disease using iPSCs

Date:
February 21, 2013
Source:
Center for iPS Cell Research and Application - Kyoto University
Summary:
Researchers have successfully modeled Alzheimer's disease (AD) using both familial and sporadic patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, and revealed stress phenotypes and differential drug responsiveness associated with intracellular amyloid beta oligomers in AD neurons and astrocytes.

Aβ oligomers in neurons from a familial AD (APP-E693Δ) (left) and from a sporadic AD patient (right) Green: Aβ oligomers, Blue: Cell Nuclear, Red: Neuron.
Credit: Courtesy of Dr. Haruhisa Inoue's laboratory.

Working with a group from Nagasaki University, a research group at the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA) has successfully modeled Alzheimer's disease (AD) using both familial and sporadic patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and revealed stress phenotypes and differential drug responsiveness associated with intracellular amyloid β oligomers in AD neurons and astrocytes.

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In a study published online in Cell Stem Cell, Associate Professor Haruhisa Inoue and his team at CiRA and a research group led by Professor Nobuhisa Iwata of Nagasaki University generated cortical neurons and astrocytes from iPSCs derived from two familial AD patients with mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP), and two sporadic AD patients. The neural cells from one of the familial and one of the sporadic patients showed endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and oxidative-stress phenotypes associated with intracellular Aβ oligomers. The team also found that these stress phenotypes were attenuated with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) treatment. These findings may help explain the variable clinical results obtained using DHA treatment, and suggest that DHA may in fact be effective only for a subset of patients.

Using both familial and sporadic AD iPSCs, the researchers discovered that pathogenesis differed between individual AD patients. For example, secreted Aβ42 levels were depressed in familial AD with APP E693Δ mutation, elevated in familial AD with APP V717L mutation, but normal in sporadic AD.

"This shows that patient classification by iPSC technology may contribute to a preemptive therapeutic approach toward AD," said Inoue, a principal investigator at CiRA who is also a research director for the CREST research program funded by the Japan Science and Technology Agency. "Further advances in iPSC technology will be required before large-scale analysis of AD patient-specific iPSCs is possible."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Center for iPS Cell Research and Application - Kyoto University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Takayuki Kondo, Masashi Asai, Kayoko Tsukita, Yumiko Kutoku, Yutaka Ohsawa, Yoshihide Sunada, Keiko Imamura, Naohiro Egawa, Naoki Yahata, Keisuke Okita, Kazutoshi Takahashi, Isao Asaka, Takashi Aoi, Akira Watanabe, Kaori Watanabe, Chie Kadoya, Rie Nakano, Dai Watanabe, Kei Maruyama, Osamu Hori, Satoshi Hibino, Tominari Choshi, Tatsutoshi Nakahata, Hiroyuki Hioki, Takeshi Kaneko, Motoko Naitoh, Katsuhiro Yoshikawa, Satoko Yamawaki, Shigehiko Suzuki, Ryuji Hata, Shu-ichi Ueno, Tsuneyoshi Seki, Kazuhiro Kobayashi, Tatsushi Toda, Kazuma Murakami, Kazuhiro Irie, William L. Klein, Hiroshi Mori, Takashi Asada, Ryosuke Takahashi, Nobuhisa Iwata, Shinya Yamanaka, Haruhisa Inoue. Modeling Alzheimer’s Disease with iPSCs Reveals Stress Phenotypes Associated with Intracellular Aβ and Differential Drug Responsiveness. Cell Stem Cell, 2013; DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2013.01.009

Cite This Page:

Center for iPS Cell Research and Application - Kyoto University. "Modeling Alzheimer's disease using iPSCs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130221141301.htm>.
Center for iPS Cell Research and Application - Kyoto University. (2013, February 21). Modeling Alzheimer's disease using iPSCs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130221141301.htm
Center for iPS Cell Research and Application - Kyoto University. "Modeling Alzheimer's disease using iPSCs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130221141301.htm (accessed March 30, 2015).

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