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Alligator relatives slipped across ancient seaways

Date:
March 4, 2013
Source:
Society of Vertebrate Paleontology
Summary:
The uplift of the Isthmus of Panama 2.6 million years ago formed a land-bridge that has long thought to be the crucial step in the interchange of animals between the Americas. However, scientists now describe fossil crocodilians that shed a surprising new light on the history of interchange and animal distributions between the Americas.

University of Florida graduate student Aldo Rincon measures the lower jaw of a new hippo-like species of anthracothere, Arretotherium meridionale. Researchers describe the 20-million-year old mammal in a study published today in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.
Credit: University of Florida photo by Jeff Gage

The uplift of the Isthmus of Panama 2.6 million years ago formed a land-bridge that has long thought to be the crucial step in the interchange of animals between the Americas, including armadillos and giant sloths moving up into North America and relatives of modern horses, rabbits, foxes, pigs, cats, dogs, and elephants down into South America.

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However, in the March 2013 issue of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, researchers from the University of Florida and the Smithsonian Tropical Research institute describe fossil crocodilians that shed a surprising new light on the history of interchange and animal distributions between the Americas.

The fossils are partial skulls of two new species of caiman, relatives of alligators, who live exclusively in South America today. They were discovered in rocks dated from 19.83 and 19.12 million years old and that were exposed by excavations associated with the expansion of the Panama Canal.

"These are the first fossil crocodilian skulls recovered from all of Central America. They fill a gap in evolution between the alligators of North America and the caimans of South America. It's quite incredible." states lead author Alex Hastings, a fossil crocodilian specialist at Georgia Southern University.

The presence of the fossils in Panama indicates that caimans dispersed North from South America by the early Miocene, which is over ten million years earlier than the spread of mammals. This discovery is additionally important because caimans lack the ability to excrete excess salt from their bodies and are restricted to freshwater environments. As a result, they could have only dispersed a short distance across sea water, which supports a recent hypothesis that Central and South America were much closer to each other 19 million years ago than previously thought, and paints a new picture of the past histories of American animals.

Says co-author Jonathan Bloch, a vertebrate paleontologist at the Florida Museum of Natural History, "We are starting to understand that while the mammals in Panama 19-21 million years ago were very similar to those found in Mexico, Texas, and Florida at that time, the reptiles tell a different story. Somehow, they were able to cross over from South America when it was completely isolated by seaways -- this is one of the mysteries that will drive future inquiry and research in this region."

Research on the fossil caimans is part of the Panama Canal Program, a National Science Foundation-funded multinational research collaboration in partnership with the Panama Canal Authority that studies the biological and geological evolution of the Neotropics based on new discoveries in Panama.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Alexander K. Hastings, Jonathan I. Bloch, Carlos A. Jaramillo, Aldo F. Rincon, Bruce J. Macfadden. Systematics and biogeography of crocodylians from the Miocene of Panama. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 2013; 33 (2): 239 DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2012.713814
  2. Aldo F. Rincon, Jonathan I. Bloch, Bruce J. Macfadden, Carlos A. Jaramillo. First Central American record of Anthracotheriidae (Mammalia, Bothriodontinae) from the early Miocene of Panama. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 2013; 33 (2): 421 DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2013.722573

Cite This Page:

Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. "Alligator relatives slipped across ancient seaways." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130304151756.htm>.
Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. (2013, March 4). Alligator relatives slipped across ancient seaways. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130304151756.htm
Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. "Alligator relatives slipped across ancient seaways." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130304151756.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

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New Fossils of Crocodilian, Hippo-Like Species from Panama

Mar. 5, 2013 — Paleontologists have discovered remarkably well-preserved fossils of two crocodilians and a mammal previously unknown to science during recent Panama Canal excavations that began in ... read more

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