Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Adults with mental illness or substance use disorder more likely to smoke

Date:
March 20, 2013
Source:
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA)
Summary:
Adults aged 18 or older who experienced any mental illness or who have had a substance use disorder in the past year are more likely to smoke and to smoke more heavily than others, according to a new report by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Adults aged 18 or older who experienced any mental illness or who have had a substance use disorder in the past year are more likely to smoke and to smoke more heavily than others, according to a new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Related Articles


According to the report, adults experiencing any mental illness or a substance use disorder in the past year represent 24.8 percent of the adult population, but that same group used 39.6 percent of all cigarettes smoked by adults.

In terms of rates of cigarette smoking, 38.3 percent of adults experiencing mental illness or substance use disorders were current smokers as opposed to 19.7 percent of those adults without these conditions. That means that the rate of current cigarette smoking among adults experiencing mental illness or substance use disorders is 94 percent higher than among adults without these disorders.

The report reveals that although people with substance use disorders and no mental disorder constitute only 4.9 percent of adults over age 18, they smoked 8.7 percent of all cigarettes. Similarly, although those who had experienced both mental illness and a substance use disorder represented only 3.8 percent of the population in the past year, they smoked 9.5 percent of all cigarettes.

The report defines any mental illness as any diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder other than a substance use disorder. The report defines a substance use disorder as dependence on or abuse of alcohol or illicit drugs.

"It has long been a public health priority to develop effective smoking prevention and cessation programs," said SAMHSA Administrator Pamela S. Hyde. "This report highlights a clear disparity. It shows that people dealing with mental illness or substance abuse issues smoke more and are less likely to quit. We need to continue to strengthen efforts to figure out what works to reduce and prevent smoking for people with mental health conditions," said Administrator Hyde.

To address the high rates of tobacco use among people with mental or substance use disorders, SAMHSA, in partnership with the Smoking Cessation Leadership Center (SCLC), has developed a portfolio of activities designed to promote tobacco cessation efforts in behavioral health care. SAMHSA and the SCLC launched the 100 Pioneers for Smoking Cessation Campaign, which provides support for mental health and substance abuse treatment facilities and organizations to undertake tobacco cessation efforts. This program has been expanded in conjunction with state Leadership Academies for Wellness and Smoking Cessation, whose goal is to reduce tobacco use among those with behavioral health needs. Participating states bring together policymakers and stakeholders (including leaders in tobacco control, mental health, substance abuse, public health, and consumers) to develop a collaborative action plan.

The report, Adults with Mental Illness or Substance Use Disorder Account for 40 Percent of All Cigarettes Smoked, is based on the findings of SAMHSA's 2009-2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). NSDUH is the primary source of statistical information on the use of illegal drugs, alcohol, and tobacco by the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years or older.

The full report can be viewed at: http://www.samhsa.gov/data/spotlight/Spot104-cigarettes-mental-illness-substance-use-disorder.pdf.

# # #

SAMHSA is a public health agency within the Department of Health and Human Services. Its mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). "Adults with mental illness or substance use disorder more likely to smoke." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 March 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130320133323.htm>.
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). (2013, March 20). Adults with mental illness or substance use disorder more likely to smoke. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130320133323.htm
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA). "Adults with mental illness or substance use disorder more likely to smoke." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130320133323.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Friday, December 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) Harvard researchers found children whose mothers were exposed to high pollution levels in the third trimester were twice as likely to develop autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Yoga can help your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and heart just as much as biking and walking does, a new study suggests. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
1st Responders Trained for Autism Sensitivity

1st Responders Trained for Autism Sensitivity

AP (Dec. 16, 2014) More departments are ordering their first responders to sit in on training sessions that focus on how to more effectively interact with those with autism spectrum disorder (Dec. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Guys Are Idiots, According To Sarcastic Study

Guys Are Idiots, According To Sarcastic Study

Newsy (Dec. 12, 2014) A study out of Britain suggest men are more idiotic than women based on the rate of accidental deaths and other factors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins