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Research identifies co-factors critical to PTSD development

Date:
April 3, 2013
Source:
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
Summary:
New research has found that the action of a specific gene occurring during exposure to adolescent trauma is critical for the development of adult-onset post-traumatic stress disorder.

Research led by Ya-Ping Tang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, has found that the action of a specific gene occurring during exposure to adolescent trauma is critical for the development of adult-onset Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD.)

The findings are published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Online Early Edition the week of April 1-5, 2013.

"This is the first study to show that a timely manipulation of a certain neurotransmitter system in the brain during the stage of trauma exposure is potentially an effective strategy to prevent the pathogenesis of PTSD," notes Dr. Tang.

The research team conducted a series of experiments using a specific strain of transgenic mice, in which the function of the gene can be suppressed, and then restored. The model combined exposure to adolescent trauma as well as an acute stressor. Clinically PTSD may occur immediately following a trauma, but in many cases, a time interval may exist between the trauma and the onset of disease. Exposure to a second stress or re-victimization can be an important causative factor. However, the researchers discovered that exposure to both adolescent trauma and to acute stress was not enough to produce consistent PTSD-like behavior. When exposure to trauma and stress was combined with the function of a specific transgene called CCKR-2, consistent PTSD-like behavior was observed in all of the behavioral tests, indicating that the development of PTSD does not depend only on the trauma itself.

As a predominant form of human anxiety disorders, PTSD affects 7.8% of people between 15-54 years in the United States. PTSD can cause feelings of hopelessness, despair and shame, employment and relationship problems, anger, and sleep difficulties. Additionally, PTSD can increase the risk of other mental health conditions including depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, and suicidal thoughts, as well as certain medical conditions including cardiovascular disease, chronic pain, autoimmune disorders, and musculoskeletal conditions.

A favored current theory of the development of anxiety disorders, including PTSD, is a gene/environment interaction. This study demonstrated that the function of the CCKR-2 gene in the brain is a cofactor, along with trauma insult, and identified a critical time window for the interaction in the development of PTSD.

"Once validated in human subjects, our findings may help target potential therapies to prevent or cure this devastating mental disorder," Dr. Tang concludes.

Other members of the LSUHSC research team included Anu Joseph, Takayoshi Mamiya, Ling-Ling Yang, and Na Yu, and scientists from Luzhou Medical College and the University of Chicago also participated. The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Alzheimer's Association, and the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. Joseph, M. Tang, T. Mamiya, Q. Chen, L.-L. Yang, J. Jiao, N. Yu, Y.-P. Tang. Temporal association of elevated cholecystokininergic tone and adolescent trauma is critical for posttraumatic stress disorder-like behavior in adult mice. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2013; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1219601110

Cite This Page:

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. "Research identifies co-factors critical to PTSD development." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403104214.htm>.
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. (2013, April 3). Research identifies co-factors critical to PTSD development. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403104214.htm
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. "Research identifies co-factors critical to PTSD development." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403104214.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

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