Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Multiple factors predict repeat suicide-related behavior in youth

Date:
April 3, 2013
Source:
St. Michael's Hospital
Summary:
New research has found that multiple factors independently predict what makes youth more likely to make repeat suicide-related behavior.

New research out of St. Michael's Hospital has found that multiple factors independently predict what makes youth more likely to make repeat suicide-related behaviour.

The study, led by Dr. Anne Rhodes, a research scientist at the hospital's Suicide Studies Research Unit, looked at whether factors such as permanent removal from the parental home by the courts due to maltreatment, neighbourhood size or income, gender, severity of first visit to an emergency department, age or having a mental disorder made youth significantly more likely to repeat suicide-related behavior.

"We wanted to look at potential risk factors in order to better understand how to prevent the need for repeat visits for suicide-related behaviours in this young population," Dr. Rhodes said. "This knowledge can then be used to guide preventive interventions."

The study looked at data from 6,484 youth age 12-17 who were seen in an emergency department for suicide-related behavior in Ontario between 2004 and 2008. Dr. Rhodes and colleagues then looked to see who among these youth had repeat visits until the end of December 2010.

The paper appeared in the journal Child Abuse & Neglect.

They were specifically interested in the risk of repetitions among the 179 youth who had been removed from their parental home.

The results found that these youth were two times more likely to repeat than their peers. "This may mean that these youth benefited from the extra supports and services provided to them," Dr. Rhodes said.

Overall, youth at risk for repetitions had a high prevalence of mental disorder, which increased their risk of repetition by about two-fold.

Girls and youth aged 12-13 were more likely to repeat than boys and those older than 13.

"These findings highlight the importance of assessing youth's family situation and whether they have a mental disorder to help prevent repetitions," Dr. Rhodes said. "As no one type of mental disorder stood out, assessments need to be comprehensive. Treatment teams also need to work closely with social workers and possibly child welfare agencies and those with expertise in child maltreatment."

Data from the Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences was used.

Funding for the research was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael's Hospital. The original article was written by Kate Taylor. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Anne E. Rhodes, Michael H. Boyle, Jennifer Bethell, Christine Wekerle, Lil Tonmyr, Deborah Goodman, Bruce Leslie, Kelvin Lam, Ian Manion. Child maltreatment and repeat presentations to the emergency department for suicide-related behaviors. Child Abuse & Neglect, 2013; 37 (2-3): 139 DOI: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2012.07.009

Cite This Page:

St. Michael's Hospital. "Multiple factors predict repeat suicide-related behavior in youth." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403154414.htm>.
St. Michael's Hospital. (2013, April 3). Multiple factors predict repeat suicide-related behavior in youth. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403154414.htm
St. Michael's Hospital. "Multiple factors predict repeat suicide-related behavior in youth." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403154414.htm (accessed August 29, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Friday, August 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Treadmill 'trips' May Reduce Falls for Elderly

Treadmill 'trips' May Reduce Falls for Elderly

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) Scientists are tripping the elderly on purpose in a Chicago lab in an effort to better prevent seniors from falling and injuring themselves in real life. (Aug.28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) It’s an unusual condition with a colorful name. Kids with “Alice in Wonderland” syndrome see sudden distortions in objects they’re looking at or their own bodies appear to change size, a lot like the main character in the Lewis Carroll story. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stopping Schizophrenia Before Birth

Stopping Schizophrenia Before Birth

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Scientists have long called choline a “brain booster” essential for human development. Not only does it aid in memory and learning, researchers now believe choline could help prevent mental illness. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Personalized Brain Vaccine for Glioblastoma

Personalized Brain Vaccine for Glioblastoma

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive brain cancer in humans. Now a new treatment using the patient’s own tumor could help slow down its progression and help patients live longer. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins