Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New guideline recommends treatments for tapeworm infection that is on rise in U.S.

Date:
April 8, 2013
Source:
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)
Summary:
The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has released an evidence-based guideline on treating neurocysticercosis, a tapeworm infection causing seizures that is common in developing countries and is now on the rise in developed countries, including the United States.

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has released an evidence-based guideline on treating neurocysticercosis, a tapeworm infection causing seizures that is common in developing countries and is now on the rise in developed countries, including the United States. The guideline is published in the April 9, 2013, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Related Articles


"It is critical for neurologists and other health care providers to recognize this infection," said guideline lead author Karen L. Roos, MD, of Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis and a Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology. "This previously rare disease in the United States is increasingly prevalent, and the infection and epilepsy due to the infection are preventable."

Neurocysticercosis is an infection of the brain or spinal cord caused by the tapeworm Taenia solium. The tapeworm can also cause taeniasis, an infection of the intestines. If the infection spreads to the brain or spinal cord, it can cause seizures, swelling of the brain and other symptoms. About two million people worldwide have epilepsy from this tapeworm, which, according to the World Health Organization, is the most common preventable epilepsy in the developing world.

The guideline, which was developed by reviewing all available evidence, determined that a combination of the drug albendazole and a corticosteroid can effectively treat neurocysticercosis. Albendazole is used to kill the parasite. Either dexamethasone or prednisolone is used to treat the inflammation that develops as the parasite is dying.

The tapeworm Taenia solium can infect people in two ways. The infection of the intestines happens when a person eats raw or undercooked meat that has the tapeworm cysts in it. A person gets neurocysticercosis by eating food or drinking water contaminated with the tapeworm eggs. Food can be contaminated with fecal matter from a person who has the infection. Usually, this happens from poor hygiene within a household or other environment.

Infection from this tapeworm is preventable. Good personal hygiene is critical to prevent the transmission of infection from person to person. This involves washing hands thoroughly after using the bathroom.

The guideline is endorsed by the American Epilepsy Society.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Neurology (AAN). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. R. A. Baird, S. Wiebe, J. R. Zunt, J. J. Halperin, G. Gronseth, K. L. Roos. Evidence-based guideline: Treatment of parenchymal neurocysticercosis: Report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology, 2013; 80 (15): 1424 DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e31828c2f3e

Cite This Page:

American Academy of Neurology (AAN). "New guideline recommends treatments for tapeworm infection that is on rise in U.S.." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130408172021.htm>.
American Academy of Neurology (AAN). (2013, April 8). New guideline recommends treatments for tapeworm infection that is on rise in U.S.. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130408172021.htm
American Academy of Neurology (AAN). "New guideline recommends treatments for tapeworm infection that is on rise in U.S.." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130408172021.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, January 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

AFP (Jan. 25, 2015) The World Health Organization&apos;s chief on Sunday admitted the UN agency had been caught napping on Ebola, saying it should serve a lesson to avoid similar mistakes in future. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Newsy (Jan. 24, 2015) Much of the Disneyland measles outbreak is being blamed on the anti-vaccination movement. The CDC encourages just about everyone get immunized. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

AP (Jan. 23, 2015) Public health officials are rushing to contain a measles outbreak that has sickened 70 people across 6 states and Mexico. The AP&apos;s Raquel Maria Dillon has more. (Jan. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins