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Ancient technology for metal coatings 2,000 years ago can't be matched even today

Date:
July 24, 2013
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Artists and craftsmen more than 2,000 years ago developed thin-film coating technology unrivaled even by today's standards for producing DVDs, solar cells, electronic devices and other products. Understanding these sophisticated metal-plating techniques from ancient times could help preserve priceless artistic and other treasures from the past.

How artisans centuries ago achieved sophisticated gilding, such as on the St. Ambrogio golden altar from 825 AD, is now coming to light.
Credit: American Chemical Society

Artists and craftsmen more than 2,000 years ago developed thin-film coating technology unrivaled even by today's standards for producing DVDs, solar cells, electronic devices and other products. Understanding these sophisticated metal-plating techniques from ancient times, described in the ACS journal Accounts of Chemical Research, could help preserve priceless artistic and other treasures from the past.

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Gabriel Maria Ingo and colleagues point out that scientists have made good progress in understanding the chemistry of many ancient artistic and other artifacts -- crucial to preserve them for future generations. Big gaps in knowledge remained, however, about how gilders in the Dark Ages and other periods applied such lustrous, impressively uniform films of gold or silver to intricate objects. Ingo's team set out to apply the newest analytical techniques to uncover the ancients' artistic secrets.

They discovered that gold- and silversmiths 2,000 years ago developed a variety of techniques, including using mercury like a glue to apply thin films of metals to statues and other objects. Sometimes, the technology was used to apply real gold and silver. It also was used fraudulently, to make cheap metal statues that look like solid gold or silver. The scientists say that their findings confirm "the high level of competence reached by the artists and craftsmen of these ancient periods who produced objects of an artistic quality that could not be bettered in ancient times and has not yet been reached in modern ones."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gabriel Maria Ingo, Giuseppe Guida, Emma Angelini, Gabriella Di Carlo, Alessio Mezzi, Giuseppina Padeletti. Ancient Mercury-Based Plating Methods: Combined Use of Surface Analytical Techniques for the Study of Manufacturing Process and Degradation Phenomena. Accounts of Chemical Research, 2013; 130705111206005 DOI: 10.1021/ar300232e

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Ancient technology for metal coatings 2,000 years ago can't be matched even today." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130724124919.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2013, July 24). Ancient technology for metal coatings 2,000 years ago can't be matched even today. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130724124919.htm
American Chemical Society. "Ancient technology for metal coatings 2,000 years ago can't be matched even today." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130724124919.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

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