Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Stopping cholesterol drugs may be associated with increased risk of Parkinson's

Date:
July 24, 2013
Source:
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)
Summary:
People who stop taking cholesterol drugs may be at an increased risk for developing Parkinson’s disease, according to new research. Previous studies on the relationship between cholesterol drugs called statins and the risk of Parkinson’s disease have had inconsistent results.

People who stop taking cholesterol drugs may be at an increased risk for developing Parkinson's disease, according to research that appears in the July 24, 2013, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Previous studies on the relationship between cholesterol drugs called statins and the risk of Parkinson's disease have had inconsistent results.

The current study involved 43,810 people in Taiwan who were taking statins and did not have Parkinson's disease. Taiwan's compulsory national health insurance program reimbursement policy requests that doctors stop prescribing statins once the patient's cholesterol reaches the treatment goal, which is contrary to standard treatment in the United States. "This policy allowed us to see whether there was any difference in the risk of Parkinson's in people who stopped taking statins compared to the ones who kept taking them," said study author Jou-Wei Lin, MD, PhD, of National Taiwan University in Taipei.

The study found a difference between two types of statins. The use of lipophilic, or fat-soluble, statins such as simvastatin and atorvastatin was associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's, while no such association was found for hydrophilic, or water-soluble, statins such as pravastatin and rosuvastatin.

Those who stopped taking the fat-soluble statins were 58 percent more likely to develop Parkinson's disease than those who kept taking the drugs, an absolute risk of 2.65 cases per one million person-days. This result was consistent even after adjusting for other conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

The study also looked at how many people taking the two types of statins developed Parkinson's disease, compared to the number of person-days spent on the medication to come up with an incidence rate. A total of 25 people taking fat-soluble statins developed Parkinson's from a total of nearly 15 million person-days on the drugs, for a rate of 1.68 cases per one million person-days on the drugs. For the water-soluble statins, 14 people developed Parkinson's from nearly four million person-days on the drugs, for a rate of 3.52 cases per one million person-days on the drugs.

"The fat-soluble statins are better able to cross the blood-brain barrier than the water-soluble statins," Lin said.

The study was supported by the Taiwan Ministry of Education.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Neurology (AAN). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Yen-Chieh Lee, Chin-Hsien Lin, Ruey-Meei Wu, Min-Shung Lin, Jou-Wei Lin, Chia-Hsuin Chang, Mei-Shu Lai. Discontinuation of statin therapy associates with Parkinson disease: A population-based study. Neurology, 2013; DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e31829d873c

Cite This Page:

American Academy of Neurology (AAN). "Stopping cholesterol drugs may be associated with increased risk of Parkinson's." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130724195945.htm>.
American Academy of Neurology (AAN). (2013, July 24). Stopping cholesterol drugs may be associated with increased risk of Parkinson's. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130724195945.htm
American Academy of Neurology (AAN). "Stopping cholesterol drugs may be associated with increased risk of Parkinson's." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130724195945.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Cases Keep Coming for Monrovia's Island Hospital

Ebola Cases Keep Coming for Monrovia's Island Hospital

AFP (Oct. 1, 2014) A look inside Monrovia's Island Hospital, a key treatment centre in the fight against Ebola in Liberia's capital city. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Puts Stress on Liberian Health Workers

Ebola Puts Stress on Liberian Health Workers

AP (Oct. 1, 2014) The Ebola outbreak is putting stress on first responders in Liberia. Ambulance drivers say they are struggling with chronic shortages of safety equipment and patients who don't want to go to the hospital. (Oct. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Reassure Public Ebola Patient Won't Cause Outbreak

Doctors Reassure Public Ebola Patient Won't Cause Outbreak

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) After the announcement that the first U.S. patient had been diagnosed with Ebola, doctors were quick to say a U.S. outbreak is highly unlikely. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
TX Hospital Confirms Patient Admitted With Ebola

TX Hospital Confirms Patient Admitted With Ebola

AP (Sep. 30, 2014) Medical officials from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital confirm they are treating a patient with the Ebola virus, the first case found in the US. (Sept. 30 Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins