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Low-voiced men love 'em and leave 'em, yet still attract more women

Date:
October 16, 2013
Source:
McMaster University
Summary:
Men with low-pitched voices have an advantage in attracting women, even though women know they’re not likely to stick around for long. Researchers have found that women were more attracted to men with masculine voices, at least for short-term relationships. Those men were also seen as more likely to cheat and unsuitable for a longer relationship, such as marriage.

This is an image of Jillian O'Connor, Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Pyschology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University.
Credit: McMaster University

Men with low-pitched voices have an advantage in attracting women, even though women know they’re not likely to stick around for long.

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Researchers at McMaster University have found that women were more attracted to men with masculine voices, at least for short-term relationships.

Those men were also seen as more likely to cheat and unsuitable for a longer relationship, such as marriage.

The study, published online in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, offers insight into the evolution of the human voice and how we choose our mates.

“The sound of someone’s voice can affect how we think of them,” explains Jillian O’Connor, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour and lead author of the study.

“Until now, it’s been unclear why women would like the voices of men who might cheat. But we found that the more women thought these men would cheat, the more they were attracted to them for a brief relationship when they are less worried about fidelity.”

For the study, 87 women listened to men’s voices that were manipulated electronically to sound higher or lower, and then chose who they thought was more likely to cheat on their romantic partner.

Researchers also asked the participants to choose the voice they thought was more attractive for a long-term versus a short-term relationship.

“From an evolutionary perspective, these perceptions of future sexual infidelity may be adaptive,” explains David Feinberg, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour.

“The consequences of infidelity are very high whether it is emotional or financial and this research suggests that humans have evolved as a protection mechanism to avoid long-term partners who may cheat,” he says.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by McMaster University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jillian J.M. O’Connor, Katarzyna Pisanski, Cara C. Tigue, Paul J. Fraccaro, David R. Feinberg. Perceptions of infidelity risk predict women’s preferences for low male voice pitch in short-term over long-term relationship contexts. Personality and Individual Differences, 2014; 56: 73 DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2013.08.029

Cite This Page:

McMaster University. "Low-voiced men love 'em and leave 'em, yet still attract more women." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131016095740.htm>.
McMaster University. (2013, October 16). Low-voiced men love 'em and leave 'em, yet still attract more women. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131016095740.htm
McMaster University. "Low-voiced men love 'em and leave 'em, yet still attract more women." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131016095740.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

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