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Crying wolf: Who benefits and when?

Date:
October 28, 2013
Source:
Indiana University
Summary:
A crisis at work can bring out the best in colleagues, often inspiring more cooperation and self-sacrifice. A study has found that the benefits are not shared equally, however, with higher-ranking group members having the most to gain by perceived threats to the group.
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A crisis at work can bring out the best in colleagues, often inspiring more cooperation and self-sacrifice. A new study from Indiana University and the University of Guelph has found the benefits are not shared equally, with higher-ranking group members having the most to gain by perceived threats to the group.

"Sociologists have known for a long time that groups tend to come together when they face adversity," said social psychologist Stephen Benard, assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at IU Bloomington. "What our research highlights is that there is a downside to our tendency to stick together when things are tough -- powerful group members can exploit that tendency to distract us from competing with them."

The study, "Who cries wolf, and when? Manipulation of perceived threats to preserve rank in cooperative groups," was published in the online journal Proceedings of the Library of Science One in September. Pat Barclay, assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at University of Guelph in Canada is the co-author.

Benard and Barclay tested their theories by creating three-person groups and having them play a cooperative group game in which people could pay money to increase the perception of threat to their group. They found that people with higher-ranking positions paid more to manipulate the threat and the action helped maintain their privileged positions.

"With this approach, we find people in high-ranking positions are more likely to manipulate apparent threats when their position is precarious, compared to when it is secure," Benard said. But this doesn't mean the next crisis at work is a ploy by the boss to boost her job security. Social science predictions involve the average person, in general, not specific people or situations.

"When groups face potential threats, it's important to judge those threats carefully," Benard said. "On one hand, you want to be alert to the fact that other group members might have an incentive to exaggerate the threat. On the other hand, it's also important not to underestimate threats that could be real."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Indiana University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Pat Barclay, Stephen Benard. Who Cries Wolf, and When? Manipulation of Perceived Threats to Preserve Rank in Cooperative Groups. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (9): e73863 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0073863

Cite This Page:

Indiana University. "Crying wolf: Who benefits and when?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131028114830.htm>.
Indiana University. (2013, October 28). Crying wolf: Who benefits and when?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131028114830.htm
Indiana University. "Crying wolf: Who benefits and when?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131028114830.htm (accessed May 25, 2015).

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