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New links between social status, brain activity

Date:
November 13, 2013
Source:
Society for Neuroscience
Summary:
New studies released today reveal links between social status and specific brain structures and activity, particularly in the context of social stress.

New studies released today reveal links between social status and specific brain structures and activity, particularly in the context of social stress. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

Using human and animal models, these studies may help explain why position in social hierarchies strongly influences decision-making, motivation, and altruism, as well as physical and mental health. Understanding social decision-making and social ladders may also aid strategies to enhance cooperation and could be applied to everyday situations from the classroom to the boardroom.

Today's new findings show that:

  • Adult rats living in disrupted environments produce fewer new brain cells than rats in stable societies, supporting theories that unstable conditions impair mental health and cognition
  • People who have many friends have certain brain regions that are bigger and better connected than those with fewer friends. It's unknown whether their brains were predisposed to social engagement or whether larger social networks prompted brain development
  • In situations where monkeys can potentially cooperate to improve their mutual reward, certain groups of brain cells work to accurately predict the responses of other monkeys
  • Following extreme social stress, enhancing brain changes associated with depression can have an anti-depressant effect in mice

Other recent findings discussed show that:

  • Defeats heighten sensitivity to social hierarchies and may exacerbate brain activity related to social anxiety

"Social subordination and social instability have been associated with an increased incidence of mental illness in humans," said press conference moderator Larry Young, PhD, of Emory University, an expert in brain functions involved with social behavior. "We now have a better picture of how these situations impact the brain. While this information could lead to new treatments, it also calls on us to evaluate how we construct social hierarchies -- whether in the workplace or school -- and their impacts on human well-being."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Neuroscience. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Neuroscience. "New links between social status, brain activity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131113092546.htm>.
Society for Neuroscience. (2013, November 13). New links between social status, brain activity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131113092546.htm
Society for Neuroscience. "New links between social status, brain activity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131113092546.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

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