Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Effect of lowering of body temperature for adults with cardiac arrest prior to hospital arrival

Date:
November 18, 2013
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
Researchers evaluated whether early prehospital cooling (lowering body temperature) improved survival to hospital discharge and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients with or without ventricular fibrillation.

Francis Kim, M.D., of Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, and colleagues evaluated whether early prehospital cooling (lowering body temperature) improved survival to hospital discharge and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients with or without ventricular fibrillation (VF).

Cardiac arrest can cause brain injury and many patients never awaken after resuscitation. Hypothermia is a promising treatment that can help brain recovery. “Hospital cooling improves outcome after cardiac arrest, but prehospital cooling immediately after return of spontaneous circulation may result in better outcomes,” according to background information in the article. “The optimal timing for induction of hypothermia is uncertain.”

For this trial, 1,359 patients (583 with VF and 776 without VF) with prehospital cardiac arrest and resuscitated by paramedics were assigned to standard care with or without prehospital cooling, accomplished by infusing up to 2 liters of 4C normal saline as soon as possible following return of spontaneous circulation. Nearly all of the patients resuscitated from VF and admitted to the hospital received hospital cooling regardless of their randomization.

The intervention reduced core temperature by more than 1C and patients reached the goal temperature about 1 hour sooner than in the control group. The researchers found that survival to hospital discharge was similar in the intervention and control groups among patients with VF (62.7 percent vs. 64.3 percent, respectively) and among patients without VF (19.2 percent vs. 16.3 percent, respectively). The intervention was also not associated with improved neurological status of full recovery or mild impairment at discharge for patients with or without VF.

“Although hypothermia is a promising strategy to improve resuscitation and brain recovery following cardiac arrest, the results of the current study do not support routine use of cold intravenous fluid in the prehospital setting to improve clinical outcomes,” the authors write.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Francis Kim, Graham Nichol, Charles Maynard, Al Hallstrom, Peter J. Kudenchuk, Thomas Rea, Michael K. Copass, David Carlbom, Steven Deem, W. T. Longstreth, Michele Olsufka, Leonard A. Cobb. Effect of Prehospital Induction of Mild Hypothermia on Survival and Neurological Status Among Adults With Cardiac Arrest. JAMA, 2013; DOI: 10.1001/jama.2013.282173

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. "Effect of lowering of body temperature for adults with cardiac arrest prior to hospital arrival." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131118081301.htm>.
The JAMA Network Journals. (2013, November 18). Effect of lowering of body temperature for adults with cardiac arrest prior to hospital arrival. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131118081301.htm
The JAMA Network Journals. "Effect of lowering of body temperature for adults with cardiac arrest prior to hospital arrival." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131118081301.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) You're more likely to gain weight while watching action flicks than you are watching other types of programming, says a new study published in JAMA. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins