Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Simulator recreates virtual taste online

Date:
January 2, 2014
Source:
National University of Singapore
Summary:
Online viewing and listening are now staples of those who live the digital life. But online tasting? This may be happening sooner than one expects, with a new taste simulator.

Digital taste experimental set-up.
Credit: Image courtesy of National University of Singapore

Online viewing and listening are now staples of those who live the digital life. But online tasting? This may be happening sooner than one expects, with a simulator invented by an engineer with the Keio-NUS CUTE Center at NUS.

Related Articles


The brainchild of Dr Nimesha Ranasinghe, Researcher at the Center who led the project, the digital device can recreate the taste of virtual food and drinks by non-invasive electrical and thermal stimulation of the tongue. This generates signals transmitted through a silver electrode touching the tip of the tongue to produce salty, sweet, sour and bitter sensations. By combining different levels of electrical currents and varying the temperature of the electrode, simulation of the tastes can be reproduced.

From experiments, sour, salty and bitter sensations were reported from electrical stimulation, while minty, spicy and sweet sensations were reported through thermal stimulation. The latter group represented minor sensations, requiring further work to intensify the tastes. The researchers qualified that the surveys were dependent on the responses of the subjects, which varied for different individuals.

This work has three novel aspects, said Dr Ranasinghe: the studying of the electronic simulation and control of taste sensations achievable through the Digital Taste Interface against the properties of current and change in temperature; the method of actuating taste sensations by electrical and thermal stimulation methods, either individually or in combination; and the aim of introducing a practical solution to implement virtual taste interactions in interactive computing systems.

The research team have developed taste-over-Internet protocol for taste messaging, a data format that facilitates the delivery of information on recreating the different tastes via the electrode.

Dr Ranasinghe said that a new reward system based on taste sensations in a gaming environment could be an early adopter of the simulator. As an illustration, if a gamer completes a task or level successfully, a sweet or minty dose will be rewarded. However, failure is delivered with a bitter taste.

The simulator could have healthcare applications. For instance, diabetics could use the device for a taste of sweetness without affecting their blood sugar levels. Cancer patients may be able to improve their dulled sense of taste during chemotherapy with the electrode.

However, the four major tastes form only part of the flavour equation. Smell and texture play key roles, which the researchers want to add on for the full tasting experience.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National University of Singapore. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National University of Singapore. "Simulator recreates virtual taste online." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140102114807.htm>.
National University of Singapore. (2014, January 2). Simulator recreates virtual taste online. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140102114807.htm
National University of Singapore. "Simulator recreates virtual taste online." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140102114807.htm (accessed January 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

NTSB: Missing Planes' Black Boxes Should Transmit Wirelessly

NTSB: Missing Planes' Black Boxes Should Transmit Wirelessly

Newsy (Jan. 23, 2015) In light of high-profile plane disappearances in the past year, the NTSB has called for changes to make finding missing aircraft easier. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Iconic Metal Toy Meccano Goes Robotic

Iconic Metal Toy Meccano Goes Robotic

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 22, 2015) Classic children&apos;s toy Meccano has gone digital, releasing a programmable kit robot that can be controlled by voice recognition. The toymakers say Meccanoid G15 KS is easy to use and is compatible with existing Meccano pieces. Jim Drury reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
The VueXL From VX1 Immersive Smartphone Headset!

The VueXL From VX1 Immersive Smartphone Headset!

Rumble (Jan. 22, 2015) The VueXL from VX1 is a product that you install your smartphone in and with the magic of magnification lenses, enlarges your smartphones screen so that it&apos;s like looking at a big screen TV. Check it out! Video provided by Rumble
Powered by NewsLook.com
Analysis: NTSB Wants Better Black Boxes

Analysis: NTSB Wants Better Black Boxes

AP (Jan. 22, 2015) NTSB investigators recommended Thursday that long-distance passenger planes carry improved technology to allow them to be found more easily in a crash, as well as include enhanced cockpit recording technology. (Jan. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins