Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Major League baseball players experience stage fright on the eve of reaching a major milestone

Date:
February 10, 2014
Source:
University of San Diego
Summary:
Researchers have found that Major League baseball players experience a bit of stage fright on the eve of reaching a major milestone.

USD Assistant Professor Nadav Goldschmied and fellow researchers have found that Major League baseball players experience a bit of stage fright on the eve of reaching a major milestone.

Goldschmied and fellow researchers studied 24 players who hit at least 505 homeruns during times in which they were to reach a major batting milestone. Using Drive Theory as a basis for their study, researchers found that it took batters significantly more time at bat when on the precipice of reaching a milestone.

The researchers explained, "Altogether, the difference between performance of the baseball players before and after career home run milestones is consistent with the hypothesis that there is an association between the type of task undertaken and the assumed stress."

During a time in history when much scrutiny is paid to player performance and performance enhancement drugs (PED), Goldschmied explains that the research indicates, "players who reached the milestone in the last 15 years do not show the same pattern of deterioration in performance prior to their crowning achievement as players who played the game before them. We suspect that PED use may provide a physiological or psychological buffer from the detrimental effects of stress."

The study appears in this month's Perception and Motor Skills journal.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of San Diego. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Nadav Goldschmied, Michael Harris, Damien Vira, Jason Kowalczyk. DRIVE THEORY AND HOME RUN MILESTONES IN BASEBALL: AN HISTORICAL ANALYSIS1. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 2014; 140206090247007 DOI: 10.2466/30.25.PMS.118k10w1

Cite This Page:

University of San Diego. "Major League baseball players experience stage fright on the eve of reaching a major milestone." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140210095128.htm>.
University of San Diego. (2014, February 10). Major League baseball players experience stage fright on the eve of reaching a major milestone. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140210095128.htm
University of San Diego. "Major League baseball players experience stage fright on the eve of reaching a major milestone." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140210095128.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) Researchers say having a cup of coffee then taking a nap is more effective than a nap or coffee alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

AFP (Aug. 29, 2014) Twenty college-age students are getting 100,000 dollars from a Silicon Valley leader and a chance to live in San Francisco in order to work on the start-up project of their dreams, but they have to quit school first. Duration: 02:20 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) A new study suggests babies develop language skills more quickly if their parents imitate the babies' sounds and expressions and talk to them often. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Electrical Stimulation Boosts Brain Function, Study Says

Electrical Stimulation Boosts Brain Function, Study Says

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) Researchers found an improvement in memory and learning function in subjects who received electric pulses to their brains. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins