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Elevated brain aluminium, early onset Alzheimer's disease in an individual occupationally exposed to aluminium

Date:
February 12, 2014
Source:
Keele University
Summary:
Research has shown for the first time that an individual who was exposed to aluminum at work and died of Alzheimer’s disease had high levels of aluminum in the brain. While aluminum is a known neurotoxin and occupational exposure to aluminum has been implicated in neurological disease, including Alzheimer’s disease, this finding is believed to be the first record of a direct link between Alzheimer’s disease and elevated brain aluminum following occupational exposure to the metal.

Computed tomography of human brain (stock image). The man in this study began to work with the preparation of a novel material used as insulation in the nuclear fuel and space industries. This work exposed him to aluminium sulphate 'dust' on a daily basis over 8 years.
Credit: beccarra / Fotolia

Research at Keele University in Staffordshire, UK, has shown for the first time that an individual who was exposed to aluminum at work and died of Alzheimer's disease had high levels of aluminum in the brain.

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While aluminum is a known neurotoxin and occupational exposure to aluminum has been implicated in neurological disease, including Alzheimer's disease, this finding is believed to be the first record of a direct link between Alzheimer's disease and elevated brain aluminum following occupational exposure to the metal.

In 2003 a 58-year-old Caucasian male with no previous medical history of note was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Ten years previous to this the man, from the north-east of England, began to work with the preparation of a novel material (DARMATT KM1) used as insulation in the nuclear fuel and space industries. This work exposed him to aluminum sulphate 'dust' on a daily basis over 8 years. An 'ordinary' dust mask was supplied to protect against inhalation of the materials. Within a short time of starting this work the man complained of headaches, tiredness and mouth ulcers. By 1999 he started to show problems in relation to memory and suffered depression.

Following his death, aged 66, in 2011, a neuropathological examination confirmed advance stage Alzheimer's disease. There then followed the most comprehensive investigation ever of the aluminum content of the frontal lobe of a single individual with 49 different tissue samples being measured for aluminum.

Professor Chris Exley, of The Birchall Centre, at Keele University, said: "The results showed unequivocally that the frontal lobe contained an average aluminum content which was at least four times higher than might be expected for an age-matched control brain.

"The observation that air-borne aluminum dust was most likely responsible for the elevated levels of aluminum in the brain must then heavily implicate the nose and possibly the lungs as the main routes of entry of aluminum into the body and the brain.

"Overall, these results suggest very strongly that occupational exposure to aluminum contributed significantly to the untimely death of this individual with Alzheimer's disease."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Keele University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Keele University. "Elevated brain aluminium, early onset Alzheimer's disease in an individual occupationally exposed to aluminium." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212093300.htm>.
Keele University. (2014, February 12). Elevated brain aluminium, early onset Alzheimer's disease in an individual occupationally exposed to aluminium. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212093300.htm
Keele University. "Elevated brain aluminium, early onset Alzheimer's disease in an individual occupationally exposed to aluminium." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212093300.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

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