Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Involved parents raise slimmer adults

Date:
February 20, 2014
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
Remember that slim kid in school -- the one with the cook-from-scratch mom? He’s likely one of the fittest dudes at your high school reunion, according to new research. "One of the best safeguards against your children becoming overweight as adults is how involved you are with their lives," one of the researchers said.

One of the best safeguards against your children becoming overweight as adults is how involved you are with their lives, new research suggests.
Credit: Bevelander KE, Kaipainen K, Swain R, Dohle S, Bongard JC, et al. (2014) Crowdsourcing Novel Childhood Predictors of Adult Obesity. PLoS ONE 9(2):e87756. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087756

Remember that slim kid in school -- the one with the cook-from-scratch mom? He's likely one of the fittest dudes at your high school reunion, according to new research from Cornell University, published online in the journal PLOS ONE.

"One of the best safeguards against your children becoming overweight as adults is how involved you are with their lives," says Cornell's Brian Wansink, professor in the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and a leader of the team that used crowdsourcing to ask 532 adults, "Which childhood experiences and behaviors might predict slimness or obesity in adulthood?"

"What's particularly amazing is how people have identified these childhood predictors of obesity that experts never thought about," says Kirsten E. Bevelander, another report author, from The Netherlands' Radboud University Behavioural Science Institute. "Things like bullying, number of friends and how often parents play outdoors with their children are significantly predictive of how much a child will weigh as an adult."

"Playing with your children, talking about nutrition and simply spending time with them will make it more likely that your child becomes a slim adult," adds Wansink, director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. "The bottom line for parents is: Spend a lot of time with your kids -- it almost doesn't matter what (activity) you do with them -- just stay in their young lives."

The study began by recruiting participants from reddit.com, the user-generated content news site, with notices posted on reddit sections for dieting, weight loss and parenting.

Each participant offered what they believed to be the best predictor of what a child would weigh as an adult -- home environment, psychosocial well-being, lifestyle, family history -- and submitted the predictor in the form of a question. Besides supplying his or her height, weight and age, participants answered questions generated by other participants about their own childhood behaviors and conditions.

The researchers said their project was among the first to use crowd-sourced information to identify new predictors that may, after further study, be useful in understanding and reducing obesity.

In the paper, the researchers encourage parents to create a "nurturing and healthy home environment and lifestyle for children that includes meals made from scratch, healthy eating conversations, plenty of sleep, outdoor exercise and supporting healthy friendships with peers."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cornell University. The original article was written by Melissa Osgood. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kirsten E. Bevelander, Kirsikka Kaipainen, Robert Swain, Simone Dohle, Josh C. Bongard, Paul D. H. Hines, Brian Wansink. Crowdsourcing Novel Childhood Predictors of Adult Obesity. PLoS ONE, 2014; 9 (2): e87756 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0087756

Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "Involved parents raise slimmer adults." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140220083009.htm>.
Cornell University. (2014, February 20). Involved parents raise slimmer adults. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140220083009.htm
Cornell University. "Involved parents raise slimmer adults." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140220083009.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Newsy (July 18, 2014) Yale researchers tested 135 men and women, and it was only obese women who were deemed to have "impaired associative learning." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins