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Increasing brain acidity may reduce anxiety

Date:
February 25, 2014
Source:
Society for Neuroscience (SfN)
Summary:
Increasing acidity in the brain's emotional control center reduces anxiety, according to an animal study. Anxiety disorders, which are characterized by an inability to control feelings of fear and uncertainty, are the most prevalent group of psychiatric diseases. At the cellular level, these disorders are associated with heightened activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), which is known to play a central role in emotional behavior. Many cells in the BLA possess acid-sensing ion channels called ASIC1a, which respond to pH changes in the environment outside of the cell. Researchers have found that activating ASIC1a decreased the activity of nearby cells and reduced anxiety-like behavior in animals

Increasing acidity in the brain's emotional control center reduces anxiety, according to an animal study published February 26 in The Journal of Neuroscience. The findings suggest a new mechanism for the body's control of fear and anxiety, and point to a new target for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

Anxiety disorders, which are characterized by an inability to control feelings of fear and uncertainty, are the most prevalent group of psychiatric diseases. At the cellular level, these disorders are associated with heightened activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), which is known to play a central role in emotional behavior.

Many cells in the BLA possess acid-sensing ion channels called ASIC1a, which respond to pH changes in the environment outside of the cell. Maria Braga, DDS, PhD, and colleagues at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hιbert School of Medicine, found that activating ASIC1a decreased the activity of nearby cells and reduced anxiety-like behavior in animals. These findings add to previous evidence implicating the role of ASIC1a in anxiety.

"These findings suggest that activating these channels, specifically in fear-related areas such as the amygdala, may be a key to regulating anxiety," explained Anantha Shekhar, MD, PhD, who studies panic disorders at Indiana University and was not involved in this study. "Developing specific drugs that can stimulate these channels could provide a new way to treat anxiety and fear disorders such a post-traumatic stress and panic disorders."

To determine the effect ASIC1a activation has on neighboring cells, Braga's group bathed BLA cells in an acidic solution in the laboratory and measured the signals sent to nearby cells. Lowering the pH of the solution decreased the activity of cells in the BLA.

Activating ASIC1a also affected animal behavior. When the researchers administered a drug that blocks ASIC1a directly into the BLA of rats, the rats displayed more anxiety-like behavior than animals that did not receive the drug. In contrast, when rats received a drug designed to increase the activity of ASIC1a channels in the BLA, the animals displayed less anxiety-like behavior.

"Our study emphasizes the importance of identifying and elucidating mechanisms involved in the regulation of brain function for the development of more efficacious therapies for treating psychiatric and neurological illnesses," Braga said. While the findings suggest that drugs targeting ASICs may one day lead to novel therapies for anxiety disorders, Braga noted that "more research is needed to understand the roles that ASIC1a channels play in the brain."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Neuroscience (SfN). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. V. I. Pidoplichko, V. Aroniadou-Anderjaska, E. M. Prager, T. H. Figueiredo, C. P. Almeida-Suhett, S. L. Miller, M. F. M. Braga. ASIC1a Activation Enhances Inhibition in the Basolateral Amygdala and Reduces Anxiety. Journal of Neuroscience, 2014; 34 (9): 3130 DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4009-13.2014

Cite This Page:

Society for Neuroscience (SfN). "Increasing brain acidity may reduce anxiety." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140225193239.htm>.
Society for Neuroscience (SfN). (2014, February 25). Increasing brain acidity may reduce anxiety. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140225193239.htm
Society for Neuroscience (SfN). "Increasing brain acidity may reduce anxiety." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140225193239.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

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