Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Picture perfect diagnosis: Telemedicine for stroke expertise

Date:
March 24, 2014
Source:
Baylor Health Care System
Summary:
Neurologic stroke expertise is coming to community-based medical centers via a portable robot communication system or telemedicine. Neuro-hospitalists use IPads or laptop computers to connect with other medical centers whenever a call comes from their emergency departments.

Neuro-hospitalist communications with emergency department physician through telemedicine.
Credit: Baylor Health Care System

When the clock starts ticking after the onset of stroke symptoms, access to a neurologist is crucial. Quickly diagnosing a stroke allows for the administration of lifesaving tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) in patients who quality for this treatment. tPA is a clot busting drug that can restore blood flow to the brain; if given to the patient within three to four hours of the onset of a stroke, tPA can improve the chances of recovering from a stroke.

Baylor Health Care System is bringing advanced neurologic stroke expertise to its community-based medical centers via a portable robot communication system or telemedicine.

"This telemedicine system allows a neurologist to look at, talk to and examine the patient, and help make treatment decisions," said Dion Graybeal, M.D., medical director for Baylor Health Care System's hub-and- spoke stroke program.

Neuro-hospitalists based at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas use IPads or laptop computers to connect with other Baylor medical centers whenever a call comes from their emergency departments. Currently Baylor Medical Centers at Irving, Garland, Waxahachie, Baylor Regional Medical Center at Plano, and Baylor All Saints Medical Center at Fort Worth utilize the hub-and-spoke stroke program.

Roll in the neurologist For Judy Buck, the neurologist's virtual presence in the emergency department helped save her life. She arrived at Baylor Medical Center at Irving after experiencing a sudden heaviness in her left side. The emergency physician ran tests and then rolled in the neurologist via the portable robot communication system.

Buck was impressed.

"It was like the doctor was standing right there," she said. "It was like science fiction."

Time is brain Dr. Graybeal and the Baylor Irving emergency department physician determined that Buck was having a stroke, and lifesaving tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) was begun.

"Unfortunately with stroke, time is brain," said Dr. Graybeal. "About 1.9 million neurons are lost with every minute of lack of blood flow."

Fortunately for Buck, from the onset of her symptoms to treatment time was just 90 minutes.

Know the signs Buck had to relearn many basic skills following the stroke; she was home in ten days and back to work in three months.

"I am on a campaign to tell people how important it is to know the symptoms of stroke," said Buck.

The American Stroke Association recommends F.A.S.T. as an acronym to remember the sudden signs of stroke: Face drooping Arm weakness Speech difficulty Time to call 9-1-1

Buck recognized that something was wrong and was lucky that her husband could take her to the hospital.

"I thank God every day that my husband took me to the hospital so quickly and that Baylor had such incredible technology to help save me," she said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Baylor Health Care System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Baylor Health Care System. "Picture perfect diagnosis: Telemedicine for stroke expertise." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324090126.htm>.
Baylor Health Care System. (2014, March 24). Picture perfect diagnosis: Telemedicine for stroke expertise. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324090126.htm
Baylor Health Care System. "Picture perfect diagnosis: Telemedicine for stroke expertise." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324090126.htm (accessed August 23, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) According to a new study, elderly people might have trouble sleeping because of the loss of a certain group of neurons in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) A new study found couples who had at least 150 guests at their weddings were more likely to report being happy in their marriages. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape

Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape

AP (Aug. 20, 2014) Nine years after Hurricane Katrina, charter schools are the new reality of public education in New Orleans. The state of Louisiana took over most of the city's public schools after the killer storm in 2005. (Aug. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins