Science News
from research organizations

E-cigarettes not associated with more smokers quitting, reduced consumption

Date:
March 24, 2014
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
The use of electronic cigarettes by smokers is not associated with greater rates of quitting cigarettes or reduced cigarette consumption after one year, a study shows. More women, younger adults and people with less education used e-cigarettes. E-cigarette use at baseline was not associated with quitting one year later or with a change in cigarette consumption.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) by smokers is not associated with greater rates of quitting cigarettes or reduced cigarette consumption after one year.

E-cigarettes are promoted as smoking cessation tools, but studies of their effectiveness have been unconvincing.

The authors analyzed self-reported data from 949 smokers (88 of the smokers used e-cigarettes at baseline) to determine if e-cigarettes were associated with more successful quitting or reduced cigarette consumption.

More women, younger adults and people with less education used e-cigarettes. E-cigarette use at baseline was not associated with quitting one year later or with a change in cigarette consumption. The authors acknowledge the low numbers of e-cigarette users in the study may have limited their ability to detect an association between e-cigarettes use and quitting.

"Nonetheless, our data add to the current evidence that e-cigarettes may not increase rates of smoking cessation. Regulations should prohibit advertising claiming or suggesting that e-cigarettes are effective smoking cessation devices until claims are supported by scientific evidence," the authors conclude.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rachel A. Grana, Lucy Popova, Pamela M. Ling. A Longitudinal Analysis of Electronic Cigarette Use and Smoking Cessation. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2014; DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.187

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. "E-cigarettes not associated with more smokers quitting, reduced consumption." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324181548.htm>.
The JAMA Network Journals. (2014, March 24). E-cigarettes not associated with more smokers quitting, reduced consumption. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 7, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324181548.htm
The JAMA Network Journals. "E-cigarettes not associated with more smokers quitting, reduced consumption." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140324181548.htm (accessed July 7, 2015).

Share This Page: