Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bioarchaeologists link climate instability to human mobility in ancient Sahara

Date:
April 15, 2014
Source:
Arizona State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Summary:
Researchers have uncovered clues to how past peoples moved across their landscape as the once lush environment deteriorated. Scientists sampled bone and teeth enamel, and used their chemical signatures to determine individuals' origins, as well as where they resided during the course of their lives. The results suggest that individuals chose different mobility strategies but that near the end of the lake area's occupation, as their environment dried out, Saharan peoples became more mobile.

Over millennia, the Sahara has gone through cycles of greening and aridity. During times when this region was lush and covered with bodies of water, it supported a wide variety of life, including human.

Related Articles


Arizona State University bioarchaeologists Christopher Stojanowski and Kelly Knudson are studying the remains of some of these ancient humans to understand how their changing climate affected their ability and need to move across the landscape.

Stojanowski and Knudson's research site is located in central Niger. Known as Gobero, it was home to a large lake during the middle Holocene, roughly five- to seven-thousand years ago. The humans who made their homes around the lake at this time depended on hunting, gathering and fishing, and some kept cattle.

Along with collaborators at the University of Chicago, Stojanowski directed excavations at the Gobero site, which offers a rich mortuary record.

Back at ASU, in the Archaeological Chemistry Laboratory, Knudson sampled bone and teeth enamel, and used their chemical signatures to determine individuals' origins, as well as where they resided during the course of their lives.

The results suggest that individuals chose different mobility strategies but that near the end of the lake area's occupation, as their environment dried out, Saharan peoples became more mobile.

"To me, what is exciting about this research is that we are able to use information from science -- including anthropology, chemistry and geology -- to understand how people in the past responded to a drier environment," Knudson says.

Adds Stojanowski, "The data seem to indicate this shift to greater mobility occurred only at the very end of the archaeological sequence, which may suggest that responses to increasingly arid conditions may have occurred only under the direst of circumstances."

Stojanowski and Knudson, who are associate professors in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, recently published their findings in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

Though the research subjects lived and died thousands of years ago, Knudson believes they have much to teach us. Understanding how they adapted to drier conditions can help human populations today and in the future to solve their own climatic challenges.

Stojanowski points out that one lesson to be learned might be that it is human nature to ignore a problem like a degrading environment until forced to face it.

"In this case, the Sahara was always going to win. The result was that a bustling center of human life and experience, one that existed for over 5,000 years, was completely abandoned and ceded to the sands," he illustrates. "I might also note that the offset of habitability may have been very quick in the sense of a human lifespan. As the Sahara dried and ecosystems adjusted, imagine the abundance of fish left in the lake, the animals drawn to the surface waters that were dwindling across northern Africa. It may have seemed like the best of times to the people that lived there -- easy and plentiful food until the Rubicon was crossed and life became unsustainable."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Arizona State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mark C. Griffin. Mission Cemeteries, Mission People: Historical and Evolutionary Dimensions of Intracemetery Bioarcheology in Spanish Florida. by Christopher M.Stojanowski. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida. 2013. 304 pp. ISBN 978-0-8130-4463-7. $79.95 (clo. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2014; DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.22516

Cite This Page:

Arizona State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. "Bioarchaeologists link climate instability to human mobility in ancient Sahara." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140415125303.htm>.
Arizona State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. (2014, April 15). Bioarchaeologists link climate instability to human mobility in ancient Sahara. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140415125303.htm
Arizona State University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. "Bioarchaeologists link climate instability to human mobility in ancient Sahara." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140415125303.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Fossils & Ruins News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deep Sea 'mushroom' Could Be Early Branch on Tree of Life

Deep Sea 'mushroom' Could Be Early Branch on Tree of Life

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 24, 2014) Miniature deep sea animals discovered off the Australian coast almost three decades ago are puzzling scientists, who say the organisms have proved impossible to categorise. Academics at the Natural History of Denmark have appealed to the world scientific community for help, saying that further information on Dendrogramma enigmatica and Dendrogramma discoides could answer key evolutionary questions. Jim Drury has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fossil Treasures at Risk in Morocco Desert Town

Fossil Treasures at Risk in Morocco Desert Town

AFP (Oct. 23, 2014) Hundreds of archeological jewels in and around the town of 30,000 people prompt geologists and archeologists to call the Erfoud area "the largest open air fossil museum in the world". Duration: 02:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Oldest Bone Ever Sequenced Shows Human/Neanderthal Mating

Oldest Bone Ever Sequenced Shows Human/Neanderthal Mating

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) A 45,000-year-old thighbone is showing when humans and neanderthals may have first interbred and revealing details about our origins. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weird-Looking Dinosaur Solves 50-Year-Old Mystery

Weird-Looking Dinosaur Solves 50-Year-Old Mystery

Newsy (Oct. 23, 2014) You've probably seen some weird-looking dinosaurs, but have you ever seen one this weird? It's worth a look. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins