Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Does your computer know how you're feeling?

Date:
August 21, 2014
Source:
Taylor & Francis
Summary:
Researchers have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87% of the time, depending on the emotion. The study combined -- for the first time -- two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Researchers have designed a computer program that can accurately recognise users' emotional states as much as 87% of the time, depending on the emotion.
Credit: jinga80 / Fotolia

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer programme that can accurately recognise users' emotional states as much as 87% of the time, depending on the emotion.

Related Articles


Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined -- for the first time -- two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

To provide data for the study, volunteers were asked to note their emotional state after typing passages of fixed text, as well as at regular intervals during their regular ('free text') computer use; this provided the researchers with data about keystroke attributes associated with seven emotional states (joy, fear, anger, sadness, disgust, shame and guilt). To help them analyse sample texts, the researchers made use of a standard database of words and sentences associated with the same seven emotional states.

After running a variety of tests, the researchers found that their new 'combined' results were better than their separate results; what's more, the 'combined' approach improved performance for five of the seven categories of emotion. Joy (87%) and anger (81%) had the highest rates of accuracy.

This research is an important contribution to 'affective computing', a growing field dedicated to 'detecting user emotion in a particular moment'. As the authors note, for all the advances in computing power, performance and size in recent years, a lot more can still be done in terms of their interactions with end users. "Emotionally aware systems can be a step ahead in this regard," they write.

"Computer systems that can detect user emotion can do a lot better than the present systems in gaming, online teaching, text processing, video and image processing, user authentication and so many other areas where user emotional state is crucial."

While much work remains to be done, this research is an important step in making 'emotionally intelligent' systems that recognise users' emotional states to adapt their music, graphics, content or approach to learning a reality.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Taylor & Francis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin, Jawad Mohammad Alam, Hasan Mahmud, Kamrul Hasan. Identifying emotion by keystroke dynamics and text pattern analysis. Behaviour & Information Technology, 2014; 33 (9): 987 DOI: 10.1080/0144929X.2014.907343

Cite This Page:

Taylor & Francis. "Does your computer know how you're feeling?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821090524.htm>.
Taylor & Francis. (2014, August 21). Does your computer know how you're feeling?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821090524.htm
Taylor & Francis. "Does your computer know how you're feeling?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821090524.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 29, 2014) A Swedish amputee who became the first person to ever receive a brain controlled prosthetic arm is able to manipulate and handle delicate objects with an unprecedented level of dexterity. The device is connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles, giving him the ability to control it with his thoughts. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots Get Funky on the Dance Floor

Robots Get Funky on the Dance Floor

AP (Oct. 29, 2014) Dancing, spinning and fighting robots are showing off their agility at "Robocomp" in Krakow. (Oct. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
IBM Taps Into Twitter's Data With New Partnership

IBM Taps Into Twitter's Data With New Partnership

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) The new partnership will allow IBM to access Twitter’s data and analytics to help IBM clients better understand their consumers. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) Google X wants to improve modern medicine with nanoparticles and a wearable device. It's all an attempt to tackle disease detection and prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins