Editorial Staff

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Created by Canadian-American science writer/editor Dan Hogan and his wife Michele Hogan in December 1995, ScienceDaily has grown from a two-person operation to a news service with roughly 2,000 contributing organizations worldwide, partnerships with major content providers, and technical support services. The web site is produced out of ScienceDaily's main office in Rockville, Maryland just outside of Washington, D.C., and is hosted on dedicated servers provided by The Planet in Dallas, Texas.

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Dan has served as the senior science editor of The New Book of Knowledge, a 21-volume encyclopedia for elementary and middle-school students published by the educational division of Grolier Publishing in Bethel, Connecticut. He has also been managing editor of Current Science, a biweekly science news magazine for junior high school students published by the Weekly Reader Corporation in Stamford, Connecticut; science writer at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine; science information officer at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario; and reporter and later copy editor for the Kingston Whig-Standard -- Canada's oldest daily newspaper. In addition, Dan has freelanced for Chemistry magazine, a national publication for students, professional chemists, and anyone interested in learning more about the chemical sciences, published by the American Chemical Society. In April 2000, Dan joined the National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Maryland, first as Senior Science Internet Specialist for the Office of Science Education at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Later, he became Web Manager for the Office of Communications and Public Liaison at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

Michele has most recently served as an eighth-grade science teacher at North Bethesda Middle School in Bethesda, Maryland. Previously, she taught fifth grade at Stone Mill Elementary School in North Potomac, Maryland; and earlier in Connecticut, she taught at Schaghticoke Middle School in New Milford and at Farmingville Elementary School in Ridgefield. She has also been education reporter for The Newtown Bee, one of the nation's few remaining independent weekly newspapers. Michele has served as a judge for annual educational software competitions at the national level sponsored by the Educational Press Association of America (EdPress). She has also judged several national middle school essay contests -- organized by the Weekly Reader Corporation's sister company, Lifetime Learning Systems. In 1998, she judged an essay contest in conjunction with HBO's award-winning "From the Earth to the Moon" television mini-series, directed by Tom Hanks. In 1999, she judged an essay contest in conjunction with the U.S. Internal Revenue Service on the question: "How would you spend America's tax dollars?". Michele's specialization is in science education, although she has taught a variety of subjects including social studies and language arts. She also has a background in business education, as a former manager for Junior Achievement in Kingston, and in recreational and competitive sailing.


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