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How Did Flightless Birds Spread Across The World?

Date:
May 22, 2014
Source:
Newsy / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
A new DNA study compared an extinct 800-pound bird from Madagascar with a chicken-sized bird from New Zealand. Who could've guessed they're related? Video provided by Newsy


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last updated on 2014-11-28 at 8:00 pm EST

Canada Puts Birds Drunk on Fermented Berries in Mini 'Drunk Tanks'

Canada Puts Birds Drunk on Fermented Berries in Mini 'Drunk Tanks'

Buzz60 (Nov. 18, 2014) — Wildlife officials in Yukon, Canada say birds such as Bohemian Waxwings are feeding on frost-fermented berries, which are making the birds too drunk to fly straight. Jen Markham explains how the government is repurposing some hamster cages as ‘bird drunk tanks,’ to help the birds sober up. Video provided by Buzz60
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Germany: Unwelcome Guests

Germany: Unwelcome Guests

Deutsche Welle (May 1, 2013) — More and more new plant and animal species are spreading across Europe. Many have been brought into the country via freight shipments or by tourists. Among them are a population of nandus that have settled in northern Germany. More than 10 years ago, six nandus escaped from a private farm. Today their number has grown to 120. The huge, flightless birds have adapted well to northern Germany's environment. But farmers and hunters don't like them. Top of their preferred menu - entire fields of young corn plants.
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Saving Lives at the Hospital: Bacterial Resistant Gowns

Saving Lives at the Hospital: Bacterial Resistant Gowns

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) — New hospital garments that repel even the deadliest forms of bacteria and how they’re stopping the spread of hospital acquired illness. Baptist Health is the first hospital system in the world to set the bar for eliminating hospital acquired infections. Video provided by Ivanhoe
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In the Studio: Prof. Mike Atkinson, Radiobiologist

In the Studio: Prof. Mike Atkinson, Radiobiologist

Deutsche Welle (Mar. 21, 2011) — Prof. Atkinson from the Helmholtz Zentrum in München talks about the safety of nuclear energy and the impact of radiation on the human body.DW-TV: With us today, to tell us more about the situation, is the head of the Institute for Radiobiology at the Helmholtz Zentrum in München, Mike Atkinson. What does this disaster mean long-term for the nuclear industry? Mike Atkinson: It gives us an opportunity to reconsider very carefully our options in nuclear safety, alternative energy sources. Does the radiation from an event of this size as far as safety goes eventually spread all over the world? There is always a possibility that a nuclear reaction can spread radioactivity over large distances. In this particular situation there is less energy in the reactor building so that high level deposition of spread is extremely unlikely." So we’re talking about weather and wind direction I suppose? The wind is a major factor, the wind drives the radioactivity in different directions, depe
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