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Denver Zoo Using the Power of Poo

Date:
March 23, 2012
Source:
Buzz60 / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
It's only a prototype now but the Denver Zoo is using animal poop and trash to power an electric rickshaw. The plan is to test the fuel's efficacy to eventually power an entire elephant pavalion. It's all part of a green experiment that will save money.


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last updated on 2014-11-26 at 2:29 am EST

Denver Zoo Embraces Dung Power

Denver Zoo Embraces Dung Power

Reuters (May 13, 2012) — The Denver Zoo is vying to become the greenest zoo in the world with the installation of a new energy system run entirely on waste. Using a process called gasification - engineers at the zoo have developed a technique they say will convert animal dung and human trash into enough energy to run the zoo's new 10 acre elephant exhibit.
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Brazil: The Solar Project in Florianpolis

Brazil: The Solar Project in Florianpolis

Deutsche Welle (June 17, 2013) — Solar power has so far played a minor role in Brazil. But now, with German aid, the country's largest photovoltaic power plant is being installed in the state of Santa Catarina, with a target capacity of 1 megawatt. Until now, only 2.5 MW of Brazil's power portfolio has been covered by solar, less than the 0.01% of the solar power share in Germany. Yet in the Earths largest tropical country, the potential is unlimited.
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Car Park Solution for Flexible Green Energy

Car Park Solution for Flexible Green Energy

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 24, 2014) — A British solar power start-up says that by covering millions of existing car park spaces around the UK with flexible solar panels, the country's power problems could be solved. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
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Tiny Bat Muscles Shed Light on Aerodynamics

Tiny Bat Muscles Shed Light on Aerodynamics

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 31, 2014) — Tiny hair-thin muscles in the skin of batwings give the creatures unprecedented control during flight, according to researchers in the United States. The scientists hope to improve the aerodynamics of planes and drones by figuring out how these muscles work and replicate their design. Video provided by Reuters
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