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White Nose Syndrome Threatens North American Bats

Date:
April 5, 2012
Source:
AFP / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
The US bat population is in crisis. Over the past seven years, as many as 6.7 million North American bats have succumbed to white nose syndrome, an illness caused by an invasive fungus that originated in Europe. Conservationists warn the loss of these vital insect-eating creatures could have a huge, and costly, impact on US agriculture.


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last updated on 2014-07-23 at 1:58 am EDT

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

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AP (Apr. 24, 2014) — A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
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Wild Chronicles: Bat Species

Wild Chronicles: Bat Species

National Geographic (Jan. 24, 2012) — They are the only mammal capable of flight, but are rarely seen by humans. Naturally nocturnal, bats live their lives primarily in darkness. Wild Chronicles sheds some light on the wild world of bats.
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Economies Dependent on Lemurs Are Hurt by Global Warming

Economies Dependent on Lemurs Are Hurt by Global Warming

TheStreet (May 16, 2014) — Renowned primatologist Dr. Patricia White explains how the tourism trade to see lemurs has helped the struggling economy of Madagascar. In her studies, Dr. White has also found that global warming is hurting the lemurs, which she says will in turn hurt the economy. Dr. White won the 2014 Indianapolis Prize, the world’s leading award for animal conservation. Dr. Wright will also receive the Lilly Medal for her dedication to the lemurs, ecosystems, and people of Madagascar. Dr. White also stars in the IMAX movie Lemurs of Madagascar. Video provided by TheStreet
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Bat Eating Spiders Are Everywhere, Except Antarctica

Bat Eating Spiders Are Everywhere, Except Antarctica

Newsy (Mar. 17, 2013) — New research published in the journal PLOS One shows spiders that build webs big enough to catch and eat bats are all over the world.
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