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Argentina Creates Drought-Resistant Gene for Crops

Date:
April 28, 2012
Source:
AFP / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Argentina's farmers cannot roll back climate change -– but with a new biotech advance which allows crops to survive in hot, dry climes, they may not need to. One team has found that transferring a sunflower gene into cereal crops like corn and soy can help them to survive longer without water, and even make them more productive. The discovery is being touted as Argentina's next genetically modified "miracle" -- for better and for worse.


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last updated on 2014-04-18 at 4:46 pm EDT

First Gene Therapy Treatment Approved in Europe

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Reuters (Aug. 8, 2012) The first gene therapy drug approval given by European regulators is potentially good news for those suffering from a rare syndrome which prevents their body from breaking down fat. The decision by the European Medicines Agency to allow Dutch biotech company uniQure to produce a gene therapy for LPLD sufferers opens the way for further developments in gene therapy treatments.
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Turf Experts Seek to Create a Better Grass for the Ground

Turf Experts Seek to Create a Better Grass for the Ground

CBC (July 4, 2013) Turf experts in Ontario are experimenting with ways to plant grass in the ground that is more resistant to drought and less friendly to lawn grubs.
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Argentinian Honey Production in Danger

Argentinian Honey Production in Danger

AFP (May 22, 2013) Many Argentinian apiculturists decide to leave the Pampas in a bid to maintain the production and the quality of their honey. In fact, the single-crop farming of soya, a pillar of Argentina's economy, has taken over the Pampas and kills the bees by thousands. Argentina is the world's second exporter of honey but soya is worth a lot more: up to 25 billion dollars in exports.
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Biofuel: A Resource of the Future

Biofuel: A Resource of the Future

Deutsche Welle (Aug. 11, 2013) With flying cameras and three-dimensional nuclear spin imaging Ulrich Schurr is studying the growth of energy crops. Rapeseed, sugar beets, China grass - these are plants which can be easily processed to give fuel and raw materials for the chemical industry. But how well, how fast and how uniformly will these plants grow in a northern German climate? The plant scientist from the Jlich Research Center is convinced that energy crops will play a big role in the future - as long as their cultivation does not compete with food crop production. To what extent that is possible - that is being investigated by a newly founded research center: the Bioeconomy Science Center.
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