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Squid Species Breaks Off Leg as Self-Defence Mechanism

Date:
August 3, 2012
Source:
Reuters / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
A squid that lives deep in the northern Pacific Ocean has evolved a lizard-like approach to self-defence. The foot-long octopus squid (Octopoteuthis deletron), jettisons its arms when confronted by a predator, creating a diversion for escape. The creature's defense strategy was observed for the first time by University of Rhode Island researcher Stephanie Bush.


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last updated on 2015-03-26 at 11:37 pm EDT

Raw: Giant Squid Caught Off Japan

Raw: Giant Squid Caught Off Japan

AP (Jan. 23, 2014) — An 11-foot long (3 meter) giant squid was caught alive off Japan this week. The squid died before reaching shore on Tuesday. It will be used for research. (Jan. 23)
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Raw: Scientists Examine Colossal Squid

Raw: Scientists Examine Colossal Squid

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) — Squid experts in New Zealand thawed and examined an unusual catch on Tuesday: a colossal squid. It was captured in Antarctica's remote Ross Sea in December last year and has been frozen for eight months. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
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Virtual Reality Therapy Uses Avatars to Teach Self-Compassion

Virtual Reality Therapy Uses Avatars to Teach Self-Compassion

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 6, 2015) — Researchers say self-compassion can be taught using avatars in an immersive virtual reality, with their trials showing reduced self-criticism and increased self-compassion in participants. The scientists behind the study are now investigating the longevity of the therapy and say it could be applied to treat a range of clinical conditions. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
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Florida Invasives

Florida Invasives

National Geographic (Mar. 15, 2012) — Florida's warm weather and lush landscape offer an attractive habitat to a number of invasive species that are wreaking havoc on local ecosystems. Wild Chronicles investigates how these non-native species, including green iguanas, lionfish and a plant called hydrilla, first arrived. Conservationists suggest the ultimate culprits may be humans who release exotic species into an environment not prepared for their presence.
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