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Psychiatrist: 20 Is 'Age of Risk'

Date:
December 14, 2012
Source:
AP / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
An expert in child and adolescent psychiatry says 20-years-old is the age of risk for developing serious mental disorders. But Fornari cautions not to leap to conclusions about 20-year-old Adam Lanza, the accused gunman in Connecticut. (Dec. 14)


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Is Schizophrenia Preventable?

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