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Scientists Create Negative Kelvin Temperature Gas

Date:
January 5, 2013
Source:
Newsy / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Scientists used lasers and magnets to turn super-cold gas to a negative temperature, opening the way for new research.


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last updated on 2014-04-19 at 11:40 pm EDT

Thinfilm Builds First Stand Alone Sensor System in Printed Electronics

Thinfilm Builds First Stand Alone Sensor System in Printed Electronics

Business Wire (Oct. 16, 2013) Thin Film Electronics ASA (Thinfilm) (OSE: THIN.OL) announced today that it has successfully demonstrated its first fully functional, stand-alone Smart Sensor Label. The temperature-tracking label, designed for monitoring of perishable goods, demonstrates a complete closed system built from printed and organic electronics. The temperature monitoring market is predicted to reach over $3.2 billion USD by 2020. Growing at 9% annually, the market is driven by a glob
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Big Data Weather: Tracking Tornadoes Goes High Tech

Big Data Weather: Tracking Tornadoes Goes High Tech

FORA.tv (May 9, 2013) Kelvin Droegemeier's research involves the dynamics and predictability of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. He helped pioneer the science of storm-scale numerical weather forecasting, leading the early development of the world's first atmospheric computer model capable of assimilating Doppler radar and other data for explicitly predicting high-impact local weather such as individual thunderstorms. High performance computing has played a key role in Droegemeier's career as an educator and scientist, and during the past decade he helped establish two supercomputing centers at the University of Oklahoma and served on NSF's Blue Ribbon Panel on Cyberinfrastructure.
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The Netherlands: Shaken Up

The Netherlands: Shaken Up

Deutsche Welle (June 19, 2013) No other land in Europe produces as much natural gas as the Netherlands. But this has come at a price for the people who live there. Drilling is causing more and more earthquakes - and stronger ones too.People in Groningen - a densely populated area in the northern Netherlands - live directly above Europe's biggest natural gas field. They've got used to the odd rumble or two, but this year alone 20 earthquakes have shaken the region. Now The Dutch Oil Company (NAM) has announced it wants to increase its rate of gas extraction. Thus far, the quakes have been relatively low in magnitude, but scientists warn this is likely to change. Angry homeowners, complaining of cracked walls and roofs, are demanding the plans be reconsidered.
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Towering Tulips Help Solar Power Flower

Towering Tulips Help Solar Power Flower

Reuters (Apr. 2, 2012) An Israeli energy company is taking flower power to a new level. The company, AORA, is using tulip-shaped towers to concentrate solar energy into a high temperature gas that can be used to power entire communities. Their newest plant has just opened in Spain.
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