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Germany's Energy Revolution: Who Will Pay the Price?

Date:
February 5, 2013
Source:
Deutsche Welle / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Not everyone supports Germany's decision to promote renewable energy, which expects consumers to foot the bill for wind and solar power infrastructure. Some people are angry, and some businesses fear for their very existence. But while some companies with high-energy needs are exempt from surcharges to cover the cost of switching to renewables, others are being forced to pay.


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last updated on 2014-04-24 at 4:55 pm EDT

Thailand Climate Protection Through Energy Efficiency

Thailand Climate Protection Through Energy Efficiency

Deutsche Welle (Mar. 13, 2012) Thailand needs ever more energy for its industry. It already imports up to 10 percent of its electricity. The growth of industry is bringing a sharp rise in greenhouse gas emissions. Now a German-Thai project funded by the International Climate Protection Initiative is working for a more efficient use of energy, thereby contributing to climate protection.The Thai government has a long-term goal of "Low-Carbon Industry". It is collaborating with Germany in the umbrella organization "Energy Efficiency for Small and Medium Enterprises" on several pilot energy-efficiency projects in small and mid-sized companies. The Environment Ministry holds consultations regularly. The aim is to cooperate with German experts and develop an "Energy Use and Climate Protection Plan" for Thailand's economy.
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Studio Guest: Dr. Brigitte Knopf, Climate Scientist

Studio Guest: Dr. Brigitte Knopf, Climate Scientist

Deutsche Welle (Sep. 11, 2011) Dr. Brigitte Knopf works for the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. She focuses on energy systems and their effect on the climate.DW-TV: Welcome to the program. Scientists from the Max-Plack-Institute suggest that wind energy is limited. What's your take on that?Brigitte Knopf: First of all it's fully correct that there is in principal a physical limit on the wind potential. But it's not relevant for energy supply for the whole world. So it's not relevant for today or for 2050 or even 2100. So nothing to worry about at the moment?Not that much, no.Would you agree that solar power is the renewable that has the most potential at the moment?At the moment yes, it has a big technical potential. But you also have to consider the costs and you have to compare the different technologies and what is less expensive.Most worldwide energy needs at the moment are still being met by carbon fuels: oil, natural gas, coal. Renewables now only cover 13% of energy needs. Only a tiny fraction
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Tidal Energy Project Makes Waves in New York

Tidal Energy Project Makes Waves in New York

Reuters (Mar. 25, 2012) New York City, one of the hungriest consumers of energy in the world, is going green with a project designed to capture tidal energy from the city's East River. The project is the first of its kind in the United States and if successful, could herald a revolution in sustainable, marine-based energy production. Tara Cleary reports.
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Germany Goes Greener, at a Cost

Germany Goes Greener, at a Cost

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 8, 2014) Germany is reforming its renewable energy law in a bid to stop costs rising so quickly, as it makes the transition from nuclear and fossil fuels to green energy, which accounts for 25 percent of Germany's electricity. As Joanna Partridge reports it will force new investors in green power to take some risk. Video provided by Reuters
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