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Lucy's Legacy Exhibits in LA

Date:
February 16, 2013
Source:
Xinhua News Agency / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
In 1974, the remains of a 3.2-million-year-old hominid were discovered in Ethiopia. Known as Lucy, the skeleton remains the oldest, and most complete adult human ancestor fully retrieved from African soil. She has now made her first trip abroad to the United States for an exhibition called "Lucy's Legacy." Lifestyles takes you to the Bowers Museum in Los Angeles for the last stop of the exhibition.


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