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Cristin Couzens Describes Her Research Suggesting That the Sugar Industry Used Big Tobacco's Tactics

Date:
March 13, 2013
Source:
CBC / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
A dentist uncovered a pile of confidential US sugar industry documents that reveal use of Big Tobacco tactics to deflect growing concern over the health effects of sugar.


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last updated on 2014-10-26 at 3:58 am EDT

Biofuel: A Resource of the Future

Biofuel: A Resource of the Future

Deutsche Welle (Aug. 11, 2013) — With flying cameras and three-dimensional nuclear spin imaging Ulrich Schurr is studying the growth of energy crops. Rapeseed, sugar beets, China grass - these are plants which can be easily processed to give fuel and raw materials for the chemical industry. But how well, how fast and how uniformly will these plants grow in a northern German climate? The plant scientist from the Jlich Research Center is convinced that energy crops will play a big role in the future - as long as their cultivation does not compete with food crop production. To what extent that is possible - that is being investigated by a newly founded research center: the Bioeconomy Science Center.
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Could Tobacco Be the Next Biofuel?

Could Tobacco Be the Next Biofuel?

AP (May 17, 2013) — Biofuel researchers at UC Berkeley may keep the tobacco industry from going up in smoke. Scientists are engineering tobacco plants to produce oils that can serve as biofuels to power airplanes, cars, trucks and other machines.
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Tobacco Plants May Help Fight Ebola, Flu & More

Tobacco Plants May Help Fight Ebola, Flu & More

AP (Aug. 15, 2014) — The Ebola outbreak is focusing attention on a burgeoning field of biomedicine called "pharming," in which tobacco plants are used to create vaccines and drugs that may help fight disease. (Aug. 15) Video provided by AP
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Recycling Seafood: Oil From Fish Waste

Recycling Seafood: Oil From Fish Waste

Deutsche Welle (June 23, 2013) — Leftovers from the fish industry might become a valuable raw material in the future. A German company has developed a system for recycling shrimp shells and other fish waste to create oils for the food production industry. The oils are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which help prevent cardiovascular problems. The aim is to minimize waste from the fish-processing industry. Other potential leftovers are turned into a powder that is high in protein and may have anti-inflammatory properties.
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