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Stanford Scientists Bring Clarity to Mouse Brain

Date:
April 11, 2013
Source:
Reuters / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Researchers at Stanford University in California have developed a process that renders an intact mouse brain transparent. By replacing the opaque fatty components in the brain with a transparent hydrogel, the wiring and molecular structure of the brain become clear to see with visible lite and chemicals. The research opens a door to new imaging techniques that could potentially be applied to human organs.


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last updated on 2014-08-01 at 12:39 am EDT

Age Reversal Protein Brings Young Hearts to Old Mice

Age Reversal Protein Brings Young Hearts to Old Mice

Reuters (June 3, 2013) — Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have identified a blood protein they say can reverse the aging process in mouse hearts. After introducing the protein into the hearts of old mice, the scientists say they saw the organs 'grow younger' before their eyes, results that could eventually help in the treatment of human heart disease.
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Mouse Is So Tough, It Uses Scorpion Venom as a Painkiller

Mouse Is So Tough, It Uses Scorpion Venom as a Painkiller

Buzz60 (Oct. 25, 2013) — Scientists discovered a type of mouse has evolved to feel scorpion venom not as pain, but as a painkiller. Jen Markham explains.
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Dragonfly Backpacks to Probe Secrets of the Brain

Dragonfly Backpacks to Probe Secrets of the Brain

Reuters (Nov. 8, 2013) — Scientists in the US are planning to map the brain activity of the dragonfly as it hunts, using a specially built backpack to transmit electrical signals from the insect's active neurons to a computer. The researchers believe that, if successful, their experiments could shed lite on how the human brain functions and how degenerative diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's develop. Rob Muir reports.
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Fruit Fly Brain Map a Boon to Neuroscience

Fruit Fly Brain Map a Boon to Neuroscience

Reuters (Aug. 29, 2013) — Scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Virginia have successfully mapped the circuitry in a small region of a fruit fly brain. It is a small but important step, according to the researchers, in gaining a better understanding of how the much larger and more sophisticated human brain processes information. Rob Muir has more.
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