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This Is Your Brain on Music

Date:
June 3, 2013
Source:
FORA.tv / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Uri Hasson is an assistant professor in the department of psychology and at the Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University. He received his doctorate in neurobiology from the Weizmann Institute in Israel. He was a postdoctoral fellow at NYU before moving to Princeton. His research is aimed at understanding how the brain processes real-life complex information and interacts with the environment, with a focus on the integration of complex information over time and the interaction between two individuals and two brains during natural communication.


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last updated on 2014-09-16 at 9:41 pm EDT

Study Shows Hearing Music While Sleeping Can Improve Memory

Study Shows Hearing Music While Sleeping Can Improve Memory

Newsy (Apr. 13, 2013) — A new study says music that syncs with your brain's rhythms can improve the brain's ability to retain information.
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3D Human Brain Map Points Way to Future Discovery

3D Human Brain Map Points Way to Future Discovery

Reuters (July 16, 2013) — German and Canadian scientists have built a three dimensional map of the human brain to help in the development of new treatments for neurological disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The "human brain map" shows the organ in unprecedented detail, allowing neuro-researchers to examine brain function and pathways on a molecular level. Rob Muir reports.
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Exercise Keeps Older Brains in Shape

Exercise Keeps Older Brains in Shape

Deutsche Welle (Aug. 4, 2013) — A healthy brain just keeps getting better with age. That is the surprising discovery of Ernst Poeppel, a brain researcher in Munich. Vocabulary, verbal memory and spacial and associative reasoning reach peak performance between the ages of 40 and 56. Ernst Poeppel says young and old brains show very little difference. So there's no reason they can't function optimally a whole life long - provided they're kept in shape like muscles. They can even grow new brain cells. The neuro-networks and transmitters, on the other hand, can get a bit rusty with age.
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Stanford Scientists Bring Clarity to Mouse Brain

Stanford Scientists Bring Clarity to Mouse Brain

Reuters (Apr. 11, 2013) — Researchers at Stanford University in California have developed a process that renders an intact mouse brain transparent. By replacing the opaque fatty components in the brain with a transparent hydrogel, the wiring and molecular structure of the brain become clear to see with visible lite and chemicals. The research opens a door to new imaging techniques that could potentially be applied to human organs.
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