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Satellite Tracking Could Be Last Hope for Elephants in South Sudan

Date:
July 3, 2013
Source:
Reuters / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Conservationists in South Sudan are using satellite technology to monitor and protect the region's threatened elephant populations. They say South Sudan's elephants are in danger of being wiped out in five years, if the current rate of ivory poaching is not curbed.


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last updated on 2014-09-22 at 2:25 pm EDT

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FORA.tv (June 27, 2013) — California Academy of Sciences - California Academy of Sciences Featuring Dr. Iain Douglas-Hamilton, Founding Director of Save the Elephants -- the leader in the pursuit of high-tech conservation solutions, which are combined with grassroots knowledge to secure a future for Africa's elephants and leverages technology to help people understand how they can live together with the wildlife of the land.
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Maasai Lease Ancestral Land to Elephants

Maasai Lease Ancestral Land to Elephants

Reuters (Aug. 7, 2013) — Maasai communities in Kenya's Amboseli region have joined the fight to save endangered elephants by leasing their ancestral lands to conservationists. The agreement is designed to protect migratory routes used by the the elephants for thousands of years, giving them breathing room in an era of unprecedented human encroachment.
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Raw: NASA Launches Satellite After 2009 Failure

Raw: NASA Launches Satellite After 2009 Failure

AP (July 2, 2014) — A rocket carrying a NASA satellite lit up the pre-dawn skies Wednesday on a mission to track atmospheric carbon dioxide, the chief culprit behind global warming. NASA lost a similar satellite in 2009 after a rocket hardware failure. (July 2) Video provided by AP
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Trouble Downstream: Ethiopia, Egypt and the Blue Nile

Trouble Downstream: Ethiopia, Egypt and the Blue Nile

Deutsche Welle (June 24, 2013) — Egypt is casting worried looks towards the south. Ethiopia is currently building the biggest dam in Africa on the Blue Nile River, close to the border with Sudan. The plan is to use the river's vast masses of water to create energy.That could cause water shortages further up the river in Egypt, but Ethiopia says it needs to use its resources to help economic growth and attract foreign investors.
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