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Appliance Harvests Fly Larvae for Human Consumption

Date:
August 2, 2013
Source:
Buzz60 / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Farm 432 is an appliance that is meant to allow humans to get more protein from bugs; flies to be specific. The device by industrial design student, Katharina Unger, collects fly larva to be used as protein, which Unger hopes will increase the world's overall food supply. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) has the rest.


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last updated on 2014-12-20 at 11:11 pm EST

Mealworms to Become Protein of the Future

Mealworms to Become Protein of the Future

Buzz60 (Dec. 20, 2012) — Mealworms could replace chicken, beef and pork as the protein of the future, according to researchers in the Netherlands. They say the beetle larvae are much more sustainable than traditional animal protein, creating less greenhouse gas and requiring half the amount of energy.
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United Against Soil Erosion: German Farmers in Georgia

United Against Soil Erosion: German Farmers in Georgia

Deutsche Welle (Nov. 4, 2012) — Less rainfall due to climate change and strong mountain winds are causing serious soil erosion in Georgia. The ongoing effects of overforestation and overgrazing during the Soviet era are exacerbating the problem. Even though Georgia's soil is richer in minerals than Germany's, soil erosion has reduced harvests there by up to 40 percent. Now German farmers are providing tips to their Georgian counterparts to help them slow down soil erosion.
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Predictive Models for Farmers: Contributing to Sustainable Agriculture

Predictive Models for Farmers: Contributing to Sustainable Agriculture

Deutsche Welle (Oct. 13, 2013) — Agricultural scientists at the University of Kiel are developing forecasting models for the use of pesticides. They're based on long-term studies of weather patterns, plant diseases and the condition of agricultural crops.The models allow farmers to see when the use of pesticides is necessary to combat certain fungi and pests and when they can be avoided. That's helping to protect the environment without endangering harvests.
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Hydroponics Bring Low-Cost Solution to High Food Prices

Hydroponics Bring Low-Cost Solution to High Food Prices

Reuters (Apr. 8, 2012) — A low-cost, easy to use hydroponics system developed in the Philippines is giving small communities with little land an inexpensive way to produce their own vegetables. The system is designed to maximize yields from limited resources and is already proving its worth with bumper harvests of inexpensive, locally grown vegetables.
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