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Fake Medicines Put Lives at Risk in Cameroon

Date:
August 22, 2013
Source:
AFP / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
It's commonplace in Cameroon for people to buy medicines at the market instead of a pharmacy. But the medication is often fake, out of date or stored in bad condition, turning the pills into toxic and sometimes deadly cocktails.


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AFP (Apr. 9, 2014) — Bee venom to combat multiple sclerosis, pollen for indigestion, honey to heal wounds - the bee has been a key source of alternative medicines since ancient times, and Romania is working to keep the tradition of "apitherapy" alive. Duration: 02:30 Video provided by AFP
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GW Pharmaceuticals Gets New York Clinical Trial for Kids

GW Pharmaceuticals Gets New York Clinical Trial for Kids

TheStreet (June 3, 2014) — Governor Andrew Cuomo announced an agreement between New York State and GW Pharmaceuticals to develop a clinical trial for children with treatment-resistant epilepsy. GW Pharmaceuticals is known for its marijuana-based medicines that use the extract cannabidiol, or CBD. The FDA has already authorized 60 children in the NYU Langone Medical Center to use GW's drug Epidiolex. There are also roughly 300 children in various sites across the country that also receive the drug. NY legislators are considering legalizing medical marijuana but the bill hasn't gone to a floor vote yet. Video provided by TheStreet
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Reality Show Couple Advocate Private Adoption

Reality Show Couple Advocate Private Adoption

AP (Mar. 20, 2014) — Gary and Cassie Chapman, stars of TNT's 'Private Lives of Nashville Wives,' say they've become advocates for private adoptions after letting cameras follow their experience. They warn that it can be a risk if the adoption falls. (March 20) Video provided by AP
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Study Finds Xpansion Interpreter Test Better Predicts Risk of Fragile X Syndrome in Child Birth

Study Finds Xpansion Interpreter Test Better Predicts Risk of Fragile X Syndrome in Child Birth

MultiVu (Mar. 21, 2013) — Asuragen Inc., a leading molecular diagnostics company, today announced results from a study demonstrating that a new molecular test called Xpansion Interpreter can improve the determination of a woman's risk of having a child with fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism, compared to existing risk measures.
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