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Are Global Temperatures Rising or Not?

Date:
September 15, 2013
Source:
Deutsche Welle / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
We're joined by Professor Ulrich Cubasch, a Climate Researcher at the Free University Berlin. He's also one of the lead authors of the United Nations IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report, which is being released at the end of September.


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last updated on 2014-07-29 at 5:38 am EDT

NASA Says 2012 Was Ninth Warmest Year on Record

NASA Says 2012 Was Ninth Warmest Year on Record

Reuters (Jan. 16, 2013) — According to NASA, 2012 was among the top 10 warmest years in the modern global record. Their scientists say the latest findings, when compared to records dating back more than 130 years, proves a continuing long-term trend of rising global temperatures. Ben Gruber reports.
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Sinking England

Sinking England

National Geographic (Feb. 8, 2012) — The British Coastlines are threatened by erosion by the North Sea. British people are debating what they can do to hold back the rising tide in their ever-shrinking island. Tilting geology and rising sea levels from global warming add to the problem. Salt marshes are also threatened by flood defenses, such as sea walls.
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Climate: Philippines How the Fishing Industry Is Tackling Climate Change

Climate: Philippines How the Fishing Industry Is Tackling Climate Change

Deutsche Welle (Sep. 16, 2013) — The Verde Island Passage in the northern Philippines is home to more documented species than any other marine habitat on earth. But this biodiversity is increasingly under threat from coastal erosion and rising water temperatures. The Conservation International (CI) environmental organization helps fishermen change their practices and thereby preserve fish stocks. During 'closed season', they can concentrate on alternative sources of income, such as tourism.
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Ecuador: The Galapagos Island Under Threat From Climate Change

Ecuador: The Galapagos Island Under Threat From Climate Change

Deutsche Welle (Oct. 7, 2013) — Ecuador's Galapagos Islands are a Unesco World Heritage site and home to flora and fauna found nowhere else in the world. But one in five native plants as well as nearly 50 percent of its endemic wildlife are under threat from climate change. Rising ocean temperatures are making it harder for species such as the famous Galapagos penguin and the giant tortoise to survive. Scientists with the Charles Darwin Foundation are doing what they can to protect these species from the effects of climate change. A number of changes to the energy sector - such as the introduction of clean electricity - are helping. The island of Floreana has already switched completely to electricity produced by jatropha seeds, which grow in the Manabi region in mainland Ecuador. Jatropha production is also bringing an economic upswing to farmers.
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