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Kiribati the Pacific Atlantis

Date:
October 14, 2013
Source:
Deutsche Welle / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Pristine white sands, palm trees and the simple life - at first sight, many would envy the Kiribati islanders. That blissful appearance is deceptive, however. The inhabitants of the chain of South Sea atolls are feeling the effects of climate change first hand. Some scientists are predicting that large parts of the nation will have disappeared completely by the end of the century. Climate refugees from the outer islands are already fleeing to the main island of Tarawa. The consequences are unemployment, domestic violence, and competition for food. Koin Etuati gives advice to schools, initiates theater productions and encourages parents to send their children to school - in the interests of giving the new arrivals a chance in their new home.


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