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Ecology Versus Economic Use the Clean Water Quarrel

Date:
November 4, 2013
Source:
Deutsche Welle / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Germany's Federal Environment Agency estimates that a quarter of all German groundwater contains excessive concentrations of nitrates - threatening some communities' water supply. The cause is over-fertilization of farmers' fields. Germany, Austria and Switzerland have been successfully joint-monitoring Lake Constance water quality for years. But authorities in Lower Saxony are only beginning to tackle the problem. Drinking water there often exceeds the EU norm of 50 milligrams of nitrates per liter.


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last updated on 2015-01-30 at 8:20 pm EST

Spain: The Battle Over Water

Spain: The Battle Over Water

Deutsche Welle (Aug. 21, 2013) — As a result of the economic crisis, many municipalities in Spain have sold their public water utilities to private companies. Now some local communities are finding out that the water supply networks are no longer being maintained properly and that water quality is on the decline. By the end of the year, about 60 percent of water utility management will be partly or entirely in private hands, making Spain the frontrunner in water privatization within Europe. Some experts are already calling it a "water bubble, and communities that are still trying to sell their water utilities are no longer able to obtain top prices. Now some communities are trying to regain public control over their water supply.
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The Rewilding of California Wolf Territory

The Rewilding of California Wolf Territory

FORA.tv (Dec. 18, 2014) — The Rewilding of California Wolf Territory California Academy of Sciences - California Academy of Sciences What would it be like to live in a world with no predators roaming our landscapes? Would their elimination bring about a pastoral, peaceful human civilization? Or in fact is their existence critical to our own, and do we need to be doing more to assure their health and the health of the landscapes they need to thrive? In this talk, Cristina Eisenberg delivers a compelling call for the necessity of top predators in large, undisturbed landscapes, and shows us how a continental-long corridor-a "carnivore way"-provides the room they need to roam and disperse. Along the way we will follow in the footsteps of six large carnivores-wolves, grizzly bears, lynx, jaguars, wolverines, and cougars-on a 7,500-mile wildlife corridor from Alaska to Mexico along the Rocky Mountains. Backed by robust science, Eisenberg shows how their well-being is a critical factor in sustaining healthy landscapes and how it is possible for humans and large carnivores to coexist peacefully and even to thrive. University students in natural resource science programs, resource managers, conservation organizations, and anyone curious about carnivore ecology and management in a changing world will find a thoughtful guide to large carnivore conservation that dispels long-held myths about their ecology and contributions to healthy, resilient landscapes. Video provided by FORA.tv
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Hungary: The Problem of Water

Hungary: The Problem of Water

Deutsche Welle (Apr. 17, 2013) — Nearly two million people in Hungary - particularly in the southeast - lack access to clean drinking water. In a number of European countries, the groundwater is contaminated with heavy metals. Hungary, Serbia and Croatia are especially affected, but the problem is particularly acute in Hungary, where many municipalities cannot afford to drill down to deeper and cleaner groundwater. At the same time, the European Union says clean water is a human right, and member states must take action to ensure it. But both local governments and national leaders in Hungary are ignoring the problem.
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Trouble Downstream: Ethiopia, Egypt and the Blue Nile

Trouble Downstream: Ethiopia, Egypt and the Blue Nile

Deutsche Welle (June 24, 2013) — Egypt is casting worried looks towards the south. Ethiopia is currently building the biggest dam in Africa on the Blue Nile River, close to the border with Sudan. The plan is to use the river's vast masses of water to create energy.That could cause water shortages further up the river in Egypt, but Ethiopia says it needs to use its resources to help economic growth and attract foreign investors.
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