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West Virginia Chemical Spill Leaves Thousands Without Clean Water

Date:
January 10, 2014
Source:
Newsy / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Thousands of people in West Virginia are being advised not to use tap water because of a chemical spill in the Elk River.


Related Videos

last updated on 2014-09-23 at 4:24 am EDT

Test Encouraging After W.va. Chemical Spill

Test Encouraging After W.va. Chemical Spill

AP (Jan. 12, 2014) — West Virginia Gov. Earl Tomblin says water tests are encouraging after a chemical spill tainted the supply, but hundreds of thousands of people are still being told not to drink or bath in the water. (Jan. 12)
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Spain: The Battle Over Water

Spain: The Battle Over Water

Deutsche Welle (Aug. 21, 2013) — As a result of the economic crisis, many municipalities in Spain have sold their public water utilities to private companies. Now some local communities are finding out that the water supply networks are no longer being maintained properly and that water quality is on the decline. By the end of the year, about 60 percent of water utility management will be partly or entirely in private hands, making Spain the frontrunner in water privatization within Europe. Some experts are already calling it a "water bubble, and communities that are still trying to sell their water utilities are no longer able to obtain top prices. Now some communities are trying to regain public control over their water supply.
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Chemical Spill Brings W.va. City to Standstill

Chemical Spill Brings W.va. City to Standstill

AP (Jan. 10, 2014) — A chemical spill left the water for 300,000 people in West Virginia's capital city stained blue-green and smelling like licorice. Officials say it is unclear when it might be safe again for even mundane activities like showers and laundry. (Jan. 10)
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Hungary: The Problem of Water

Hungary: The Problem of Water

Deutsche Welle (Apr. 17, 2013) — Nearly two million people in Hungary - particularly in the southeast - lack access to clean drinking water. In a number of European countries, the groundwater is contaminated with heavy metals. Hungary, Serbia and Croatia are especially affected, but the problem is particularly acute in Hungary, where many municipalities cannot afford to drill down to deeper and cleaner groundwater. At the same time, the European Union says clean water is a human right, and member states must take action to ensure it. But both local governments and national leaders in Hungary are ignoring the problem.
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