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Saving young hearts, saving young athletes

Date:
February 3, 2014
Source:
Ivanhoe / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
If your kid plays sports, chances are you’ve worried about concussions. But did you know the number one killer of young athletes is actually sudden cardiac arrest? Find out what you need to know before your child takes the field. Video provided by Ivanhoe.


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last updated on 2014-11-21 at 10:00 pm EST

Hard Hits and Head Trauma, the Dangers of Team Sports

Hard Hits and Head Trauma, the Dangers of Team Sports

AFP (Feb. 5, 2013) — The Super Bowl wraps up the football season this Sunday, but concerns about head injuries from high-impact sports continue. One doctor has invented an iPhone app to help school coaches diagnose concussions in their teenage athletes.
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Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series Features High-Flying Daredevils

Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series Features High-Flying Daredevils

Buzz60 (July 23, 2012) — Are these guys nuts? Or are they among the most talented but hardly known athletes in the world? Red Bull's Cliff Diving World Series is jumping from one spectacular location to another. This stop, the Azores; next stop, Ireland. Each location takes your breath away as daredevils seem to defy nature, gravity and common sense.
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New Concussion Test Keeps Athletes Safe

New Concussion Test Keeps Athletes Safe

Ivanhoe (July 3, 2013) — About 400,000 high school and college athletes suffer a concussion each year. It’s not surprising to find out that football players are most at risk. In fact, at least one player sustains a mild concussion in each game, but did you know that you can get hit hard, not sustain a concussion, and still put your brain at risk? Now, there’s a new test that can show within seconds if a player should be pulled from the game even if they don’t have a concussion.
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iPads for Infants Stir Debate

iPads for Infants Stir Debate

AFP (Apr. 25, 2012) — From musical instruments to coloring books, the range of apps aimed at young children has boomed in the past two years. But psychologists and parents are divided on putting smartphones and tablets into such young hands, considering how pivotal the first couple of years are to child development.
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