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Western U.S. Drought Caused Earth's Crust To Rise

Date:
August 22, 2014
Source:
Newsy / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
A study published in Science shows that the earth's crust has risen a sixth of an inch in the western United States due to extreme drought. Video provided by Newsy


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last updated on 2014-10-22 at 11:58 pm EDT

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Billion Dollar Drilling Project Aims for Earth's Mantle

Reuters (Jan. 8, 2013) — A Japanese-led project aims to drill to the Earth's mantle, a 3000 kilometer-thick layer of slowly deforming rock between the crust and the core. In its early stages, the $US1 billion mission would deploy a drill just 30 centimeters wide to bore into the Earth's crust to bring back the first ever samples of fresh mantle rock.
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Ranchers Pray for Rain in Drought Hit California

Ranchers Pray for Rain in Drought Hit California

AFP (Feb. 5, 2014) — California Governor Jerry Brown declares a state of emergency due to what could be the worst drought in a century. For ranchers, the drought means no grass for their cattle, forcing them to buy expensive hay or just sell their cows. Video provided by AFP
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As Drought Continues LA "water Police" Fight Waste

As Drought Continues LA "water Police" Fight Waste

AFP (Aug. 29, 2014) — In the midst of a historic drought, Los Angeles is increasing efforts to go after people who waste water. Five water conservation "cops" drive around the city every day educating homeowners about the drought. Duration: 02:17 Video provided by AFP
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In the Studio: Prof. Danijel Schorlemmer, Seismologist

In the Studio: Prof. Danijel Schorlemmer, Seismologist

Deutsche Welle (Mar. 21, 2011) — Prof. Schorlemmer from the German Research Centre for Geosciences, GFZ, in Potsdam is an expert in the area of earthquake forecasting.DW-TV: Japan is a society that has played a pioneering role in a wide number of technologies -- including of course earthquake warning systems. But even then, people have just five seconds after the warning comes to brace themselves. Cutting straight to the chase, thousands of detection stations around the world, international networks, decades of research -- why can't we predict earthquakes yet? Danijel Schorlemmer: Well, even though we have thousands of stations, we have a big problem. We only measure the signals on the earth’s surface. Unlike in meteorology, where you can measure all the values you’re interested in, like humidity, wind-speed and so on in 3-D, we only see the earth’s surface. We cannot make measurements in the earth, which would be very important to understand what’s going on. And we’re also lacking a precursor phenomenon, a
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