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Underused Drugs Effective In Treating Alcoholism, Study Says

Date:
May 14, 2014
Source:
Newsy / Powered by NewsLook.com
Summary:
Researchers have found two medications — acamprosate and oral naltrexone — are more effective than traditionally used disulfiram in treating AUDs. Video provided by Newsy


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last updated on 2014-07-24 at 10:42 am EDT

Decades Old Stroke Damage Reversible With Oxygen Therapy, Say Researchers

Decades Old Stroke Damage Reversible With Oxygen Therapy, Say Researchers

Reuters (May 2, 2013) — Up to 20 years after suffering a stroke, patients in Israel are reporting remarkable improvements in brain function with calibrated oxygen treatments inside hyperbaric chambers. While treating stroke patients with hyperbaric oxygen is nothing new, the fact that it can be effective after so many years is an exciting new development according to specialists at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center. Jim Drury went to see the therapy demonstrated.
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Your Brain on Music

Your Brain on Music

CBC (Apr. 1, 2013) — Music boosts the body's immune system and is more effective than prescription drugs in reducing anxiety before a surgery, a research review from two psychologists at Montreal's McGill University suggests.
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Doping the Brain: The Dangerous Side Effects of 'Smart Drugs'

Doping the Brain: The Dangerous Side Effects of 'Smart Drugs'

Deutsche Welle (Oct. 13, 2013) — Just pop a pill and you're suddenly at the top of your game - that's a dream fueled by the widespread global abuse of drugs that claim to enhance mental performance.Klaus Lieb, director of the clinic for psychiatry and psychotherapy at the University of Mainz, has found that around 20 percent of students and surgeons in Germany have experimented with so-called brain doping. But do these pills really help? And what about their side effects? For a study, Lieb made 40 chess players face off against a computer - with the help of ritalin, modafilin and a placebo.
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Study Finds Oreos Are as Addictive as Cocaine, Morphine

Study Finds Oreos Are as Addictive as Cocaine, Morphine

Newsy (Oct. 16, 2013) — A new study out of Connecticut College finds Oreo cookies actually activate more neurons in the brains 'pleasure center' than many drugs.
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