Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Good Manners Put The Brakes On "Road Rage"

Date:
June 16, 1998
Source:
Economic & Social Research Council
Summary:
A major cause of anger while driving is the inconsiderate and discourteous behaviour of other road users--not blatant law-breaking--according to ESRC-funded research by Professor Geoffrey Underwood at the University of Nottingham. If drivers adopted better road manners much of Britain's reported "road rage" could be eradicated.

A major cause of anger while driving is the inconsiderate and discourteous behaviour of other road users--not blatant law-breaking--according to ESRC-funded research by Professor Geoffrey Underwood at the University of Nottingham. If drivers adopted better road manners much of Britain's reported "road rage" could be eradicated.

"Road rage"--ranging from verbal or gesticulatory abuse to dangerous driving which forces others to pull over and leave the road--is a common phenomenon on British roads. A 1995 Automobile Association survey found that 90% of 526 motorists questioned had experienced "road rage" incidents in the previous year. But what factors make drivers most angry? What is the relationship between anger and near accidents? And what is the effect of traffic congestion on anger intensity?

To find answers to these important questions, Professor Underwood and colleagues examined the detailed two-week audio-cassette diaries of 100 drivers, aged between 17 and 42 and almost equally divided between male and female.

Each driver was also assessed on a Driver Anger Scale, which listed six potentially anger-provoking driving situations,.Police presence was found to be the least anger-provoking and discourtesy the greatest, with hostile gestures, slow driving, illegal driving and traffic obstructions in between.

Drivers also completed a Driver Behaviour Questionnaire, to discover how often they admitted to committing driving slips, mistakes and violations; and a Social Motivation Scale, which asked questions about attitudes to mild social deviance ("cheating").

The drivers reported a total of 292 near accidents and 385 occasions when they experienced anger. Where anger was directly associated with a "near miss", in 109 out of 110 cases anger followed as a direct result , rather than prior to the incident.

Specific types of near accident were more likely to provoke anger than others, in particular where the reporting driver considered themselves not at fault. And although the drivers did not report more anger during periods of heavy traffic, anger levels rose with traffic levels.

"Perhaps drivers need to be made more aware of the potential impact on other roads users of discourteous behaviour, such as driving on other people's bumpers or cutting in on other drivers", said Professor Underwood. "Campaigns aimed at more courteous driving practice could make a significant difference."

For further information about "The Causes and Consequences of Anger While Driving," contact Kathy Ham, Jacky Clake, David Ridley, Tim Whitaker, ESRC External Relations. Tel: 01793 413032, 413117, 413118, 413115.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Economic & Social Research Council. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Economic & Social Research Council. "Good Manners Put The Brakes On "Road Rage"." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 June 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/06/980616064007.htm>.
Economic & Social Research Council. (1998, June 16). Good Manners Put The Brakes On "Road Rage". ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/06/980616064007.htm
Economic & Social Research Council. "Good Manners Put The Brakes On "Road Rage"." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/06/980616064007.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

Share This



More Science News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

What This MIT Sensor Could Mean For The Future Of Robotics

What This MIT Sensor Could Mean For The Future Of Robotics

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) MIT researchers developed a light-based sensor that gives robots 100 times the sensitivity of a human finger, allowing for "unprecedented dexterity." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Climate Change Rally Held in India Ahead of UN Summit

Climate Change Rally Held in India Ahead of UN Summit

AFP (Sep. 20, 2014) Some 125 world leaders are expected to commit to action on climate change at a UN summit Tuesday called to inject momentum in struggling efforts to tackle global warming. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: San Diego Zoo Welcomes Cheetah Cubs

Raw: San Diego Zoo Welcomes Cheetah Cubs

AP (Sep. 20, 2014) The San Diego Zoo has welcomed two Cheetah cubs to its Safari Park. The nearly three-week-old female cubs are being hand fed and are receiving around the clock care. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins