Top Health News
October 13, 2015

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October 13, 2015

Local Government Supervisor Training Can Be More Efficient

Oct. 13, 2015 — City department supervisors would benefit from training roughly every eight to nine months on conceptual leadership skills, like strategic planning and conflict resolution, according to a study. ... read more

Bacterium That Causes Q Fever Linked to Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Oct. 13, 2015 — The bacterium that causes Q fever, an infectious disease that humans contract from animals, is associated with an increased risk of lymphoma, according to a ... read more

Listeria Can Grow on Unrefrigerated Caramel Apples

Oct. 13, 2015 — Caramel apples punctured with dipping sticks and left unrefrigerated over the course of a couple of weeks may harbor a bacterium called Listeria monocytogenes, according to a ... read more

Social Media Content May Hold Keys to Important Health Information

Oct. 13, 2015 — Language used in everyday social media posts may have a strong connection to an individual’s health. In the first study of its kind, the new results suggest that not only are many adult Facebook ... read more

Novel Imaging Study Demonstrates How the 'Social Brain' Is Functionally Impaired in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Oct. 13, 2015 — Brain areas linked to social behaviors are both underdeveloped and insufficiently networked in youths with high functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to study participants without ASD, ... read more

Calcium Supplements May Increase the Risk of Kidney Stone Recurrence

Oct. 13, 2015 — Calcium supplements may increase the risk of kidney stone recurrence, according to a new ... read more

Oct. 13, 2015 — The average life span of smokers is more than 10 years shorter than that of non-smoker, and it is said that smoking is a factor which accelerates aging. However, the details of the mechanism which ... read more

New Research Sees Zebrafish Earn Their Stripes in the Fight Against Muscular Dystrophy

Oct. 13, 2015 — New research has demonstrated a new method for observing the behavior of the protein Dystrophin in a living animal cell, in real-time. This breakthrough may provide a key to understanding how to ... read more

Oct. 13, 2015 — A variety of animals are able to sense and react to electric fields, and living human cells will move along an electric field, for example in wound healing. Now researchers have found the first ... read more

Health Care, Research Failing to Adapt to US's Growing Multiracial Population

Oct. 13, 2015 — Health care and research are failing to adapt data collection methods to the growing multiracial population in the US, an author suggests in a new ... read more

Ancient Human Ear-Orienting System Could Yield Clues to Hearing Deficits in Infants

Oct. 13, 2015 — Vestigial organs, such as the wisdom teeth in humans, are those that have become functionless through the course of evolution. Now, a psychologist studying vestigial muscles behind the ears in humans ... read more

Video Conferencing Could Increase Shared Decision-Making in Hospice Care

Oct. 13, 2015 — Shared decision-making, although beneficial, could be enhanced in hospice care, say authors of a new report. The researchers recommend that health care workers employ measures such as video ... read more

'I Am Right for Your Child!' The Key to Winning Over Your Future in-Laws

Oct. 13, 2015 — The key to dealing with future in-laws who disapprove of your relationship may involve showing them what a good influence you are on their child, rather than manipulating them with gifts. An author ... read more

Scientists Find External Environment, Oxidation Greatest Threats to DNA

Oct. 13, 2015 — Forces in the external environmental and oxidation are the greatest threats to an organism's ability to repair damage to its own DNA, new research ... read more

Cell Authentication Survey Shows Little Progress in a Decade

Oct. 12, 2015 — A new survey of almost 450 biomedical researchers from every major stakeholder group (e.g., academia, industry) shows little has changed in cell line authentication and culture practices in the past ... read more

Double Enzyme Hit May Explain Common Cancer Drug Side Effect

Oct. 12, 2015 — Many leukemias are caused by loss of the enzyme Pten. Some anti-leukemia treatments work by inhibiting another enzyme called Shp2. Researchers have now found that mice lacking both of these enzymes ... read more

Workplace Mentors Benefit Female Employees More Than Men

Oct. 12, 2015 — The success of online networking sites such as LinkedIn illustrates the popularity of building a wide-ranging contact list. Yet when it comes to raising one's profile within the workplace, ... read more

In Females, Childhood Head Injury Could Lead to Alcohol Abuse Later in Life

Oct. 12, 2015 — Girls who suffer a concussive bump on the head in childhood could be at increased risk for abusing alcohol as adults, a new study suggests. The research in mice found that females with a mild ... read more

HIV Drugs Provide Added Benefit of Protecting Against Hepatitis B Virus

Oct. 12, 2015 — In a study involving 2,400 men who have sex with men who were also enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, researchers report that men with HIV who were treated effectively with HIV therapy ... read more

Oct. 12, 2015 — Inhibiting infants' tongue movements impedes their ability to distinguish between speech sounds, researchers have found. The study is the first to discover a direct link between infants' ... read more

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