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Research Aims To Keep Electricity Flowing Smoothly

Date:
November 4, 1998
Source:
Purdue University
Summary:
As the nation's electric power grid and its support systems become increasingly complex, and as demand for electricity grows, a new research program at Purdue University is investigating ways to keep it up and running.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- As the nation's electric power grid and its support systems become increasingly complex, and as demand for electricity grows, a new research program at Purdue University is investigating ways to keep it up and running.

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Researchers in Purdue's School of Nuclear Engineering and Department of Computer Science have received a three-year, $1.5 million grant from the Electric Power Research Institute and the Department of Defense to investigate ways to ensure the smooth operation of the U.S. infrastructure, particularly the electric power grid.

The grant will fund the multidisciplinary Consortium for the Intelligent Management of the Electric Power Grid, or CIMEG. Purdue is the lead institution in the new consortium, which also includes the University of Tennessee, Fisk University, Tennessee Valley Authority and Commonwealth Edison.

The aim of the consortium is to develop methods and computer models to ensure that complex interactive infrastructures remain operational under ever-changing demands.

"Our goal is to develop anticipatory models that will keep small failures small enough to ensure the survival of the entire grid," said Lefteri Tsoukalas, associate professor of nuclear engineering and chair of the consortium's steering committee. "Anticipatory models will tell what the entire grid will be like in the future and will guide management responses at the local level."

Part of the work will focus on developing computer tools to make short- and long-term predictions and to aid decision-making. Researchers also will develop software to model loads and electricity generation, as well as sophisticated computer simulations and visualizations.

Arden Bement, the Turner Distinguished Professor of Engineering and head of Purdue's School of Nuclear Engineering, is the director of the consortium.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Purdue University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Purdue University. "Research Aims To Keep Electricity Flowing Smoothly." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 November 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/11/981104075502.htm>.
Purdue University. (1998, November 4). Research Aims To Keep Electricity Flowing Smoothly. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/11/981104075502.htm
Purdue University. "Research Aims To Keep Electricity Flowing Smoothly." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/11/981104075502.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

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